Essential Oils – List

There are more than 140 types of essential oils, each with its own unique smell and potential health benefits. Here’s the list of the most popular essential oils we have researched for you –

1. Lavender

Lavender Essential Oil

The fragrant influence of Lavender essential oil is calming, relaxing, and balancing, both physically and emotionally.

How to use –

  • Mix 1 or 2 drops of Lavender essential oil to your pillow bedding at bedtime for a relaxing sleep.
  • Add 3-4 or 8-10 of Lavender essential oil in the diffuser of your choice to create a calming environment.

2. Lemongrass

Lemongrass

The pungent aroma of the Lemongrass essential oil makes it a favorite for massage.

It offers purifying benefits for the skin and promotes a positive outlook.

How to use –

  •  Add 5 to 6 drops of Lemongrass Essential oil to your diffuser to create a fresh and peaceful environment.
  • Mix 2-3 drops of Lemongrass essential oil with 5ml of suitable carrier oil and apply it to the bottoms of your feet at night to induce a calm and deep sleep.
  •  Combine 2-3 drops of Lemongrass essential with 5ml Coconut Oil for a massage to relieve sore muscles.
  • Dilute Lemongrass oil with a suitable carrier oil, then rub or spritz on the skin before going outside to naturally repel insects.

3. Peppermint

Peppermint

The high menthol content on the Peppermint essential oil sets it apart from the rest of the oils. It stimulates the mind and clears the sinuses.

How to use –

  • Use 3 to 4 drops in the diffuser of your choice to create a fresh environment.
  • Mix 2-3 drops of Peppermint essential oil with 5ml of suitable carrier oil and dab it on the temples, forehead, over the sinuses(careful to avoid contact with your eyes), and on the back of the neck to relieve head pressure.
  • Use a dilution of 10 drops peppermint oil per 1 ounce of carrier oil to soothe irritated skin.

4. Rosemary

Rosemary

The herbaceous and energizing scent is frequently used in aromatherapy. The woody, evergreen herb has been used in folk medicine for thousands of years to improve memory, and relieve muscles aches and pains Avoid if you have high BP.

How to use –

  • Add a single drop to your handkerchief to flood the senses for up to a minute.
  • Diffuse rosemary or apply tropically to help reduce tension, stress and fatigue.
  • Mix 2tbsp of Coconut oil with 1 tbsp of raw honey and 3 drops of Rosemary essential oil and apply this onto your scalp, hair shafts and tips of your hair for soft, nourished hair.

5. Tea Tree

Tea Tree

Known for purifying qualities, Tea Tree essential Oil has carried the ‘Cure All” reputation for ages.

How to use –

  • For occasional skin irritations, Mix 1-2 drops of Tea Tree essential oil with 5ml of a suitable carrier oil and apply onto affected areas.
  • Combine 1-2 drops of Tea Tree essential with your facial cleanser for added cleansing properties, or apply to skin after shaving.
  • Mix to 1-2 drops of Tea Tree essential oil with 5ml of a carrier oil and apply into the fingernails and toenails after showering to purify and keeps nails looking healthy.
  • Add 2-3 drops to a spray bottle with water and use on surfaces to protect against environmental threats.

6. Ylang Ylang

Ylang Ylang

Known for its unique floral aroma, Ylang Ylang essential oil was used as natural hair growth remedy in Victorian England and has continued to be used to treat fine and limp hair .

How to use –

  • Homemade hair conditioner at your service, ma’am! Two drops each of Ylang Ylang and Coconut oil is all you need for a natural hair care treatment.
  • Level up your Sunday pamper sessions! Add two drops of this essential oil to your facial steam.

7. Citronella

Citronella Essential Oil

This essential oil is known for its fresh, lemony fragrance. Known as a great mood elevator, Citronella essential oil fights depression and gives relief from anxiety and negativity.

How to use –

  • See you never, headache! Just 2-3 drops + a hot or cold compress = magic!
  • Off-the counter deodorants are so passé. Enter a concoction of the Citronella essential oil and an effective carrier oil to banish BO once and for all.

8. Orange

Orange

The fresh concentrated orange aroma of Orange essential oil has a calming effect. Considered a symbol of good luck by the ancient Chinese, Orange essential oil has detoxifying properties.

How to use –

  • Kiss goodbye to pesky pimples with this citrus wonder. Mix a drop of this essential oil to Aloe Vera gel and apply to the affected areas before hitting the bed.
  • Seasonal allergies getting the better of you? Treat the tingle in your nose with just a sniff of this Orange oil.

 

9. Lemon

LemonAlso known as liquid sunshine, Lemon essential oil has a sour, citrus and slightly sweet aroma. Its rejuvenating properties keep you healthy and distressed.

How to use –

  • Oily skin : mix 10-15 drops Lemon essential oil with 50gm of jojoba cream and apply.
  • Greasy hair : Add 4 drops to wet palms, apply to freshly washed hair and rinse
  • All-purpose home cleanser : Mix 10-15 drops with vinegar
  • Add 3 to 4 drops of Lemon essential oil in the diffuser of your choice to create an uplifting environment and positive mood.

10. Turmeric

Turmeric

Known as nature’s wonder drug and the golden spice. Turmeric essential oil has been used historically in Ayurveda for numerous treatments. It is rich in antioxidants that add glow to your health and beauty.

How to use –

  • Younger skin: Mix 4-5 drops with carrier oil and apply.
  • Get rid of dandruff: Add a few drops to your hair oil and massage.
  • All purpose home cleanser : Mix 10-15 drops with vinegar
  • Add 3-4 drops of Turmeric essential oil in the diffuser of your choice to get relief from stress.

11. Frankincense

Frankincense Essential Oil

An ancient oil, often used during prayers, Frankincense essential oil has a woody and earthy aroma. This oil has scar fading and anti aging benefits.

How to use –

  • Anti-aging : Mix 6 drops Frankincense essential oil with 30ml of carrier oil and apply.
  • Stress relieving bath soak : Add a few drops of Frankincense essential oil to hot bath.
  • Relief from cold and flu: Add a few drops on a cloth and inhale.
  • Add 3-4 drops of Frankincense essential oil in the diffuser of your choice to neutralize indoor pollution and deodorize your surroundings.

12. Cedar wood

Cedar Wood Essential Oil

Known as a symbol of wisdom and protection, Cedar wood has been mentioned in the Bible. Carrying a woody and warm aroma, this essential oil is known to benefit dry skin and simulate hair growth.

How to use –

  • Dry Scalp : mix 2 drops of Cedar Wood essential oil with coconut oil and massage 30 minutes before taking a head bath
  • Anti-acne scrub : Mix Cedar wood essential oil with Epsom Salt and coconut oil to get a slightly rough and oily mixture to use it as a scrub.
  • Cough relief : Rub 2 drops of Cedar wood essential oil on your chest and throat before you go to sleep.

13. Cinnamon

Cinnamon

A well-known spice. Cinnamon‘s benefits are diversified in the form of its essential oil. Its spicy and warm aroma has a soothing effect.

How to use –

  • Dry Skin : Make an overnight mask by mixing 3-4 drops of cinnamon essential oil with your night cream.
  • Hair tonic : Mix 4-5 drops of cinnamon oil with 5tbsp olive oil and massage on your scalp 45mins before taking a head bath
  • Lip plumper : Mix 2 drops cinnamon oil with 1tbsp petroleum jelly.
  • Add 3 to 4 drops of Cinnamon essential oil in the diffuser of your choice to create a soothing environment.

14. Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus essential oil

With a wide range of benefits, Eucalyptus essential oil comes with a minty aroma that has disinfecting and energizing properties.

How to use –

  • Moisturize hair : Mix a few drops with coconut or olive oil.
  • Natural hand cleanser : Make a cleaning mix to remove grease and dirt, mix Epsom salt, sea salt and  eucalyptus essential oil.

15. Geranium

geranium

A sweet smelling essential oil, Geranium essential oil has strong astringent and muscle toning properties.

How to use –

  • Anti Wrinkle : Add 2 drops to your face lotion and apply twice daily.
  • Skin Enhancer : Add 5 drops with 1 tbsp Coconut Oil.
  • Add 3-4 drops in the diffuser of your choice to make the environment soothing and also prevent nose and throat infections.

16. Basil

Basil

Basil oil (Basil CT linalool) is a wonderfully sweet-smelling oil, valued for its soothing and calming properties.

How to use –

  • Add 3-4 drops in the diffuser of your choice to make the environment soothing and increase alertness.
  • Make a hair pack for darker hair by adding 8-10 drops to a paste of amla powder and apply on face.
  • Prevent blackheads and whiteheads : Add 2-3 drops basil oil to a mixture of fuller’s earth, honey and lemon juice and apply as a face pack for 15 mins.

17. Patchouli

Patchouli Essential Oil

Patchouli oil has an readily recognizable rich, musky-sweet fragrance, which can have a grounding, balancing effect on the emotions.  It also offers a number of benefits for the skin

How to use –

  • Anti-ageing : Add 5 drops to your face wash or lotion.
  • Strengthen hair : Add 5 drops to your hair oil and massage or add it to hair conditioner.
  • Add 3-4 drops of Patchouli in the diffuser of your choice and drive away depression and anxiety.

18. Bergamot

Bergamot

Bergamot oil has a fresh, sweet, citrusy scent.  Unique among citrus oils, it is highly favored for its lovely fragrance and calming properties.

How to use –

  • Reduce acne scars : Put 5 drops on a cotton ball and apply on effected area.
  • Heal skin : Add 10 drops to warm bath.
  • Hair growth tonic : Mix coconut oil and castor oil in equal quantity and add few drops of Bergamot essential oil.
  • Add 3-4 drops of Patchouli in the diffuser of your choice to feel refreshed and relaxed.

19. Rose

Rose

The pungent aroma of the Lemongrass essential oil makes it a favorite for massage.

It offers purifying benefits for the skin and promotes a positive outlook.

How to use –

  • Get glowing skin by adding to any skin cream/lotion by increasing its absorption by the skin.
  • Treat acne : Add 4-5 drops of Rose essential oil in 1tbsp coconut oil and apply thrice daily.

20. Argon

argon

Beauty secret of the Moroccans, this golden oil is rich in antioxidants and rejuvenating vitamin E. It is light weight

Best suited for : Oily/Sensitive/Acne Prone/Mature/Normal/Blemished Skin

How to use –

  • Moisturize skin and reduce fine lines : Moisturize just one drop in circular motions over face and neck
  • Overnight deep conditioning for brittle hair : Warm a few drops between your palms and massage from scalp to ends, cover with a shower cap and wash in the morning.
  • Beard Oil : Soften a scratchy beard by applying 1-2 drops and comb through it.
  • Hydrating Lip Scrub : Mix 2-3 drops with sugar to make a paste and exfoliate your lips.
  • Skin Toner : Prepare green tea with a tea bag, add 2-4 drops of Argon oil, store it in a glass bottle and use regularly.

21. Marula

Marula

Long preserved throughout the history in southern and western Africa, Marula oil is extremely rich in Omega 6 and Omega 9 and other antioxidants.

Best suited for : Mature/Dry/Dull Sensitive/Blemished Skin

How to use –

  • Reduce scars and stretch marks : Massage 1-2 drops on the effected area daily.
  • Soften hair and protect from UV Rays : Warm a few drops between your palms and apply.
  • Healthy Cuticles : Apply on nails and cuticles every night.
  • Natural Primer : Lightly dab a few drops on your skin before applying makeup.
  • Fight acne scars : Apply on affected area daily.

22. Avocado

avocado

Native to Central and South America, Avocado is one of the best examples of skin food. Rich in fatty acids and vitamins, it has high penetration properties and makes an ideal carrier oil for skin and hair.

Best suited for : Dry/Sensitive/Acne Prone

How to use –

  • Overnight Moisturization :  Massage a few drops after washing your face.
  • Hair growth treatment : Mix 6 drops lavender oil or peppermint essential oil with 30 ml avocado oil and massage on scalp twice a week.
  • Chemical free makeup remover : Mix 2tbsp avocado oil and 1/2 tbsp castor oil and use it to wipe your makeup gently.
  • Soothe cuticles and feet : Rub a small amount on feet and dry cuticles before going to bed.

23. Rosehip

Rosehip

Beauty Secret from Chile. Rosehip Oil is a dry oil that absorbs very quickly. Having miraculous healing and anti ageing benefits, this oil is valued by women all around the world as a part of their beauty regime.

Best suited for : Dry/Sensitive/Mature

How to use –

  • Remove fine lines and wrinkles : Mix 1ml Rosehip oil with 1/2 ml Vitamin E and massage twice a day.
  • Lighten dark spots : Mix 2ml Rosehip oil with 2drops lavender essential oil and massage twice a day.
  • Fade Scars : Mix 2 ml rosehip oil with 2 drops frankincense essential oil and apply twice a day.
  • Nourish dry scalp : Massage a few drops few hours before taking a head bath.
  • Get a dewy finish with matte foundation : Mix 2 drops of rosehip essential oil with foundation before applying.

24. Pomegranate seed

Treasured in the middle-east, Pomegranate has been associated with regeneration for a long time. The oil has skin healing benefits.

Best suited for : Dry/Mature/Burnt/ Irritated skin

How to use –

  • Heal acne, scars, rosacea : Apply 1-2 drops directly on effected area directly.
  • Repair and restore shine of hair : Apply directly on the strands like a serum.
  • Midnight hydrating serum : Mix 20ml Jojoba oil + 10ml Castor oil + 10ml pomegranate seed oil + 10 ml rosehip oil + 2 Vitamin E capsules +2 drops patchouli essential oil + 1 drop Ylang Ylang essential oil + 1 drop orange essential oil in an amber bottle and apply every night.

25. Sea Buckthorn

Known as “God Sent Medicine” with a long history of uses in folk medicine, sea buckthorn oil has uniquely high fatty acid content. It can work wonders for skin, hair and nails equally.

Best suited for : All Skin types

How to use –

  • Cure dark sun spots : Dab a few drops on affected area after washing your face and before applying your face cream.
  • Heals dry skin : Regular application heals dry and patched skin.
  • For healthy scalp and hair : Massage a few drops on the scalp twice a week.
  • Brittle nails : Rub a few drops on your nails every night.
  • Acne treatment serum : Mix and store 2tbsp argan oil + 1/2 tbsp sea buckthorn oil + 2 drops geranium oil+ 2 drops tea tree oil + 2 drops lavender oil and apply every night.

26. Apricot Kernel

Native to Armenia, Apricot oil has also been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. A natural moisturizer with excellent hydrating properties, this oil improves skin tone and can reverse UV ray damage.

Best suited for : Dry/Sensitive/Mature/Normal Skin

How to use –

  • Reduce under eye wrinkles and fine lines : Apply under the eyes every night.
  • Firms and tones skin : Mix a few drops of your favourite essential oil and apply regularly.
  • Anti-acne serum : Mix 1 oz apricot kernel oil + 12 drops lavender essential oil + 7 drops tea tree essential oil – 1 drop geranium essential oil and store in an amber bottle and apply everynight.

27. Moringa

Moringa

Indian in origin and valued by the Ayurveda, Greeks, Romans and Egyptians alike, Moringa oil is a good antiseptic and anti-inflammatory oil. This too being a dry oil is easy to use and incorporate in your beauty regime.

Best suited for : Oily/Acne Prone/Mature/Normal Skin

How to use –

  • Moisturize oily skin : Take 2-3 drops on our palms and gently dab it on clean face.
  • Hydrate dry skin : Apply a light layer of moringa oil before applying your moisturizer.
  • Cleanse and detoxify your scalp : Massage few drops and leave overnight.
  • Natural makeup primer : Massage 1/2 tbsp oil on your face before applying makeup.
  • Nourish dry and brittle nails : Apply few drops on the nails daily.
  • Maintain your curls : Use it as a leave in serum on curly hair.

28. Jojoba

jojoba

Originating in Southern Arizona, Southern California and North Western Mexico, Jojoba oil has been long valued by the Native Americans for treating skin problems. Rich in vitamins. It makes your skin beautiful in many ways.

Best suited for : Acne Prone/Mature/Sensitive/Normal Skin

How to use –

  • Ease sunburn and redness : Apply few drops on affected area.
  • Regulate oily skin : Apply on your skin to control sebum.
  • For Shiny Hair : Use as a serum to tame, dry, fizzy hair and to add shine.
  • Anti-acne serum : Mix 20 drops tea tree essential oil + 15 drops lavender oil + 15 frankincense essential oil + 10ml Jojoba oil and store in amber bottle and use every night.

29. Carrot Seed

Carrot Seed

Native to Europe, Carrot seed oil is a popular ingredient in skincare products around the world. It has a naturally high SPF value and can protect skin against many infections and pollution.

Best suited for : Mature/Acne prone/ Irritated/Normal skin

How to use –

  • Skin rejuvenating mask : Mix 1tbsp bentonite clay + 1tbsp aloe vera gel + 2 drops carrot seed oil and apply.
  • Even out complexion : Apply a few drops on your skin regularly.
  • Lighten and revive aging skin : Mix equal amount of carrot seed and pomegranate seed oil and apply a few drops everyday.
  • Glowing skin scrub : Mix 2tbsp coconut oil + 2tbsp raw honey + 4tbsp coffee ground + 8 drops carrot seed oil + 6 drops tea tree essential oil.

30. Arborvitae

Known as the “tree of life,” Arborvitae is majestic in size and abundant in unique benefits. Our arborvitae essential oil is sourced from the heartwood of the Thuja plicata tree. It is also known as Western Red Cedar and is native to North America (primarily Canada and the Northwestern United States). This unique source of Arborvitae essential oil contains a distinct chemical profile and is uniquely concentrated in methyl thujate. The sourcing arrangements for this oil are done in an innovative, environmentally responsible way through distillation of residual wood materials to ensure no trees are unnecessarily harvested for production. Native to Canada, all parts of the Arborvitae tree were used extensively by Native Americans for health benefits and for building vessels, totem poles, baskets, and clothing. Because of its natural preserving properties, Arborvitae prevents wood from rotting, which makes it popular in woodcraft and for preserving natural wood surfaces.

How to use –

  • Add a few drops to a spray bottle with water and spray on surfaces or hands for a quick DIY cleaner.
  • Apply to wrists and ankles while hiking.
  • Diffuse to purify the air and to repel insects inside the home.
  • Mix 4 drops of Arborvitae essential oil and 2 drops of Lemon essential oil for a natural wood preservative and polish.
  • Use during meditation for a sense of peace and calm

31. Blue Tansy

Blue Tansy

Blue Tansy essential oil is obtained from the leaves, flowers, and stems of the plant Tanacetum annuum. The name Blue Tansy is actually a misnomer; the plant itself is a yellow-flowered Mediterranean herb native to Morocco. The oil of the Blue Tansy plant belongs to a group called the chamomile oils, which also includes Roman Chamomile and German Chamomile. In this context, it is no surprise that Blue Tansy is sometimes referred to as “Moroccan Blue Chamomile.” Chamazulene, a chemical component in Blue Tansy, provides the characteristic indigo color and is recognized for its skin soothing benefits. At the same time, the main chemical component Sabinene helps diminish the appearance of blemishes. Uplifting to the mood, Blue Tansy provides a sweet aroma to fill any room. It’s perfect for massaging into skin with fractionated coconut oil or lotion after a long day of work or intense exercise to aid the body in the natural recovery process.

 

How to use –

  • Diffuse to uplift mood and create a positive atmosphere.
  • Add a drop to 1 or 2 oz of your favorite moisturizer or cleanser and apply topically to help reduce the appearance of blemishes or soothe skin irritation.
  • Include 1 or 2 drops in lotion for a restoring massage after a stressful day or extreme workout.

32. Birch

Birch

Birch essential oil contains the same active ingredient as Wintergreen Massage into hands, back, and legs for a soothing and warming sensation after exercise Place a few drops of Birch on a cotton ball and place in your gym bag. Birch’s strong scent will work to mask any odor Apply to skin to reduce the appearance of blemishes

How to use –

  • Massage into back and legs for a cooling sensation after exercise.
  • Place a few drops of Birch on a cotton ball and
  • place in your gym bag to mask any odor.
  • Apply to skin to help reduce the appearance of blemishes.
  • Diffuse for a sweet, uplifting aroma
  • Commonly used in oral hygiene care products

33. Black Pepper

Black Pepper

Black pepper is stimulating and highly antioxidant essential oil.  It has been shown to support healthy circulation, aid the digestive system and soothe nerves and lessen anxious feelings.  Black pepper is also a wonderful flavor enhancer.  But use sparingly.  A little goes a long way.

Black pepper is a multi-purpose, certified pure, therapeutic-grade essential oil, extracted, through steam distillation, from the unripe, red fruit of the Piper nigrum plant.  It yields an essential oil with a hot, sharp, fruity, spicy aroma.  The fruit is best known as a common cooking spice, that enhances the flavor of foods; but its oil has other internal and topical benefits that are equally noteworthy.

How to use –

  • Combine one to two drops with carrier oil, to soothe sore muscles and joints, or to warm the skin during cold weather.
  • Diffuse, or inhale directly, to soothe anxious feelings
  • Take one to two drops daily, in veggie caps, when seasonal threats are high.
  • Add to meats, soups, entrees and salads, to enhance food flavor and aid digestion.

34. Cardamom

Cardamom

A close relative to ginger, cardamom has a long history as a cooking spice.  It is also know to be beneficial to the digestive system, in a variety of ways. Cardamom is commonly used to help ease occasional indigestion and calm occasional stomach upset, helping to maintain an optimal gastrointestinal balance.  It also promotes clear breathing and respiratory health, while promoting a positive mood. Cardamom oil is steam distilled from the seeds of the Elettaria cardamomum plant.  It yields an oil that is spicy, fruity, warm and balsamic, and can be used aromatically, topically and by ingestion.

Best suited for : Mature/Acne prone/ Irritated/Normal skin

How to use –

  • Diffusion: Use three to four drops in the diffuser of your choice.
  • Internal use: Dilute one drop in 4 fl oz of liquid.
  • Topical use: Apply one to two drops to desired area. Cardamom is a very gentle oil, but dilution with carrier oil will help to minimize any possible skin sensitivity.  See additional precautions below.

35. Cassia

Cassia

Cassia, a close relative of cinnamon, is notable for its wonderful fragrance.  It has been used, literally, for thousands of years, both for its fragrance and uplifting properties, and to promote healthy digestion and circulation, support healthy immune function and help to soothe sore, achy muscles.

A close relative to cinnamon, cassia has a strong, spicy, cinnamon-like aroma that can be used in small quantities to transform any essential oil blend.  It is steam distilled from the bark of the Cinnamomum cassia tree.

Cassia has been used for thousands of years.  It’s one of the few essential oils mentioned in the Old Testament, noted for its unmistakable fragrance and uplifting properties.

Cassia is a “warming” oil, that helps to promote circulation and maintain healthy immune function.  When diluted, cassia can help to soothe sore, achy joints.  It also promotes healthy digestion, and is a great oil to diffuse during cold months, due to its warming and uplifting aroma.  It can also be used in cooking, either as a replacement for cinnamon, in pies and breads, or by itself, in a myriad of entrees and desserts.

Due to its caustic nature, cassia should be well diluted with carrier oil, when applied to the skin.  It can also be very strong, when inhaled directly. Primary benefits of cassia oil

How to use –

  • Add one drop to citrus blends, or diffuse with clove and ginger during fall and winter months.
  • Take one to two drops, in veggie capsules, for added immune support, when seasonal threats are high.
  • Combine one drop with carrier oil, and apply to sore, achy joints.
  • Combine one to two drops with lemon, in a glass of water, to aid digestion.

36. Cilantro

Cilantro

Cilantro essential oil, comes from the leaves of the coriander (Coriandrum sativum) plant.  It is often used by food connoisseurs as a fresh and tasty flavor enhancer; but cilantro also has many diverse benefits that may be enjoyed, including as an antioxidant, as an aid to digestion, and as a powerful cleanser and detoxifier.

The health and wellness supportive properties and culinary uses of cilantro have been documented for centuries.

How to use –

  • Take daily, during a body cleansing regimen.
  • Add to stir fries, salads and dips, to experience cilantro’s distinct flavor and internal health benefits.
  • Diffuse, with citrus essential oils, for a fresh, herbal aroma.
  • Apply one to two drops to minor skin irritations.

37. Clary Sage

Known for its uplifting and mood-lightening attributes, clary sage is also widely used by women, to soothe monthly discomfort associated with their menstrual cycles.  It was also studied by noted expert, Robert Tisserand, for its soothing effects on nervous tension during massage.

Clary sage (Salvia sclarea) is a biennial or perennial herb, that grows up to six feet in height.  The oil is steam distilled from the flower, yielding an oil with a woody, herbal, coniferous aroma.  This mellow, warm, herbal scent helps to soothe nervous tension and lighten mood.

Clary sage is known for its ability to soothe discomforts associated with a woman’s monthly menstrual cycles, and help to balance hormones.  The main chemical component of clary sage is linalyl acetate, part of the esters group, making it one of the most relaxing, soothing and balancing essential oils.

In the Middle Ages, the Salvia sclarea plant was nicknamed “clear eyes”, and it was frequently used for female discomfort and for soothing minor skin irritations. Inhaling clary sage can soothe nervous tension and lighten mood.

How to use –

  • Diffusion: Use three to four drops in the diffuser of your choice.
  • Internal use: Dilute one drop in 4 fl oz of liquid.
  • Topical use: Apply one to two drops to desired area. Although gentle enough to be used neat, dilution with carrier oil will help to minimize any skin sensitivity.  See additional precautions below.

38. Clove Bud

Clove oil is much more than just a popular cooking spice, with its sweet, spicy fragrance; it is a favorite among health care professionals and health conscious individuals alike, for its many useful and healing properties.  With powerful antioxidant properties, clove supports a healthy immune system.  It also helps to promote circulation and support cardiovascular health, and it promotes oral health.

Clove oil is steam distilled from the aromatic flower buds the Eugenia caryophyllata tree, in the family Myrtaceae.  It yields an oil with a very spicy, warm, woody aroma, with subnote of leather.  This makes it excellent for use in cooking, in place of the dried spice.  It adds a spicy flavor to any dish or dessert, while providing important internal health benefits. One of clove oil’s principal constituents is eugenol, which can promote circulation and support cardiovascular health.  But, due to its high phenol content, caution should be taken when inhaling clove directly; and it should be diluted when applied to the skin.

Clove has been used for years in dental preparations, candy and gum, for its flavor and ability to promote oral health.  Dentists frequently use it, to help soothe teeth and gums and promote oral health.

Clove also has powerful antioxidant, making it supportive of a health immune system.

How to use –

  • Add one drop to toothpaste, to promote oral health.
  • Apply one drop, to soothe teeth or gums.
  • Take in veggie capsules, to boost immunity during winter time.

39. Copaiba

Copaiba essential oil is steam distilled from the gum resin that is tapped from Brazil’s copaiba trees – Copaifera reticulata, officinalis, coriacea, and langsdorffii spices. This tree grows upwards to 100 feet and produces yellow flowers and a reddish fruit. Interestingly, asingle tree may offer up to twelve gallons of oil each season! Burned in ceremonies for physical and spiritual healing, the resin is used in a variety of ways and can be found in virtually every market in South America. This essential oil appears pale yellow in color and has a slightly bitter taste. The resin that makes the oil is extracted from has been used as a native folk remedy dating back to the 16th century.

How to use –

  • Add 1 to 2 drops to water, juice, or tea to support the health of the cardiovascular, immune, digestive, nervous, and respiratory system.
  • Provides antioxidant support when ingested.
  • Take internally to help soothe and calm the nervous system.
  • Apply topically combined with a carrier oil or a facial moisturizer to help keep skin clean and clear, and to help reduce the appearance of blemishes.

40. Coriander

Coriander essential oil has been used for centuries for its soothing and calming properties, to ease occasional stomach upset and promote healthy digestion.  It has been studied for its ability to help maintain an already
healthy insulin response.  Coriander can also be used to soothe muscles and joint discomfort, and tone and rejuvenate the skin.

Coriandrum sativum is an annual herb, growing to about three feet in height, and is very aromatic.  Coriander essential oil is extracted, through steam distillation, from the seeds of this plant, yielding an oil with a green, sharp, herbaceous aroma.

Popular across many cultures, for various uses, coriander oil’s health-supportive properties can be attributed to its extremely high linalool content.  Its benefits range from the promotion of healthy digestion and easing of occasional stomach upset, to helping to maintain an already healthy insulin response.  It is helpful in soothing joint and muscle discomfort, tones and rejuvenates the skin and helps oily skin areas to reduce breakouts.

Coriander oil has a sweet, warm, herbaceous fragrance, with soothing and calming properties, making it a good rotation oil to use in blends to add a fresh, herbaceous note.

How to use –

  • To assist with digestion, after eating large meals, take a few drops internally and rub on your stomach.
  • Apply to oily skin areas to reduce breakouts.
  • Mix with Metabolic blend, to maintain a healthy insulin response.
  • Apply to sore muscles and joints, or use with carrier oil for massage.

41. Cypress

Cypress

Cypress essential oil is popularly used to ease breathing.  It can also be used to ease tight, tense muscles and, used topically, to support localized blood flow.  It also has a grounding, yet stimulating effect on the emotions.

Cypress oil is steam distilled from the twigs and foliage of the Cupressus sempervirens, the tall evergreen tree, yielding an oil with a very pleasing, clean, fresh, woody, herbaceous aroma.  The oil contains monoterpenes, making it beneficial for oily skin conditions, and to stimulate localized blood flow.

Cypress is popularly used to assist clear breathing.  It can be diffused or inhaled directly, to promote healthy respiratory function.

Cypress is frequently used in spas, and by massage therapists, for its ability to soothe tight, tense muscles and promote localized blood flow.  It also has a grounding, yet stimulating and uplifting effect on the emotions, making it a popular oil to diffuse during times of transition or loss.

How to use –

  • Diffuse, inhale or rub on the chest, with carrier oil, topromote healthy respiratory function.
  • Apply to tight, tense muscles, or use with a carrier oil for massage, to support localized blood flow and soothe the muscles.
  • Add one to two drops to toner, to help reduce oily skin conditions.
  • Mix together cypress and grapefruit oils, with carrier oil, and rub on problem areas, to help give skin a more youthful appearance.

42. Douglas Fir

Douglas Fir

Douglas FirPseudotsuga menziesii – is a conifer that grows natively throughout North America. This tall, evergreen fir tree is frequently used in the Christmas tree industry and has a lemonscented note that’s sweet and refreshing.Douglas Fir essential oil is sustainably sourced from young trees in New Zealand.

Douglas Fir has a unique chemical composition that’s particularly rich in beta-pinene, contributing to its ability to promote feelings of clear airways.

Douglas Fir can also be used to purify the skin and promote a positive mood. Blending Douglas Fir with citrus oils will create an uplifting environment while freshening the air.

Main Chemical Components are B-pinene, a-pinene, 3-carvene, sabinene.

 

How to use –

  • Combine Douglas Fir with Wild Orange, Lemon, or Bergamot in a diffuser to freshen the air, uplift mood, and promote a sense of focus
  • Add 1 drop to facial cleanser, bar soap, or body wash for added cleansing benefits and an invigorating aroma
  • Diffuse 2–3 drops Douglas Fir with 2–3 drops Eucalyptus, or rub into hands and inhale deeply to promote feelings of clear airways and easy breathing
  • Combine with 1–2 drops of Wintergreen for a relaxing massage experience.

43. Fennel

Sweet fennel

Sweet fennel is best known for its distinct licorice aroma and taste; yet its ability to relieve occasional indigestion and digestive troubles, as well as easing monthly menstrual cycles are equally noteworthy.  It also supports a healthy lymphatic system and calms minor skin irritations.Foeniculum vulgare is a flowering plant species, in the celery family (Apiaceae or Umbelliferae).  An upright, branching perennial, that can grow up to six feet in height, it has delicate, feathery leaves.  It is typically grown in vegetable and herb gardens, for its licorice or anise-flavored seeds.

Used for centuries, for its many health benefits, the history of fennel dates back to ancient times, when Roman warriors were said to have consumed it, to make them strong and ready for battle.

Sweet fennel‘s oil is steam distilled from Foeniculum vulgare seeds, and yields an oil with a sweet, honey-like, yet spicy, aroma, with familiar licorice or anise notes.  It is often used to relieve occasional indigestion and digestive troubles, and to support a healthy lymphatic system.

How to use –

  • Rub fennel on your stomach, or on the bottom of your feet, to help ease menstrual or digestive discomfort.
  • Add to desserts, for an additional depth of flavor.
  • Add 1–2 drops to a glass of warm water or tea, to relieve occasional indigestion or digestive troubles.

44. Ginger

Ginger

Although ginger is an indispensable component of worldwide cuisine, it is most notable for its ability to ease occasional indigestion and nausea.  Ginger‘s warm, earthy, sweet, citrus-like fragrance accompanies a multitude of other health benefits, including its promotion of digestion and support for overall
digestive health.

Ginger root has offered health and culinary benefits to mankind since the beginning of recorded history.  Esteemed from antiquity as a spice, and recognized for its affinity for the digestive system, ginger root was used by the ancient Egyptians, in cuisine and for other purposes.  As long as 4,000 years ago, and the Greeks, used ginger
in gingerbread.  In China, ginger was used in tonics.  In India, it was used for as a
soothing tea.  And other people groups,from around the world, have long enjoyed its delightful benefits.

Taken from the rhizome, or rootstock, ginger root has many traditional uses.  A featured ingredient in many Asian dishes, it features a hot, fragrant flavor.  In Western
tradition, ginger root is most often used in sweets – gingerbread and ginger snaps being two examples.

Ginger essential oil is steam distilled from this rhizome, or rootstock, of the Zingiber officinale, a flowering plant in the family Zingiberaceae, yielding an oil with a warm, citrus-like, spicy, earthy, sweet aroma.

Its unique scent is the expression of hundreds of individual compounds.  In fact, ginger is one of nature’s most complex essential oils.  And, an almost infinite cascade of beneficial properties results from the synergistic reaction of its chemical constituents, making it one of the most valuable of the oils.

Best known for its support of overall digestive health, and for helping to ease occasional indigestion and nausea, ginger also promotes digestion.  It can also be applied topically or inhaled, to help ease occasional digestion issues.

How to use –

  • Put 1–2 drops in water, to help with occasional indigestion or nausea.
  • If you are feeling nauseated, put a drop of ginger in the palm of your hands and inhale.
  • Rub 1–2 drops on your stomach, or the bottom of your feet, to promote digestion.
  • Use ginger oil in your favorite sweet and savory dishes.

45. Grapefruit

Grapefruit‘s fresh, invigorating aroma is sure to please the senses.  It cleanses and purifies, is beneficial for oily skin issues, supports healthy metabolism, and helps to reduce mental and physical fatigue, while helping with sore muscles and joints.  All of these have made it a favorite among essential oil lovers.

Referred to as a “forbidden fruit” and one of the “Seven Wonders of Barbados”, grapefruit was first documented in 1750, by Welshman Rev. Griffith Hughes.  The name “grapefruit” is attributed to the fruit’s growing in clusters, which resemble those of grapes.

Grapefruit oil is cold-pressed from the rind (peel) of the Citrus X paradisisfruit, yielding an oil with a citrus, floral, fruity aroma, and a high d-limonene content.

Known for its energizing and invigorating effect, grapefruit oil helps reduce mental and physical fatigue and supports healthy metabolism.  It is also renowned for its cleansing and purifying benefits.  It is beneficial for oily skin issues and helps to purify, as it cleanses.

How to use –

  • Diffuse, to sharpen focus and reduce mental fatigue, while studying or reading.
  • Diffuse, or apply topically, to reduce physical fatigue.
  • Apply to sore muscles and joints.
  • Diffuse, or take internally, to support healthy metabolism.
  • Diffuse, or apply topically, to cleanse and purify.
  • Add a drop to skin care products, to benefit oily skin issues.
  • Mix together grapefruit and cypress oils, with carrier oil, and rub on problem areas, to help give skin a more youthful appearance.
  • Can be used as a cleaning spray (just add a few drops to water in a spray bottle, shake and spray on surfaces).
  • It makes an excellent fruit and vegetable wash. To clean your vegetables, just add several drops to a large bowl or sink of water and wash.

46. Helichrysum

Helichrysum

One of the most precious and sought-after of the essential oils, helichrysum has traditionally been used to help relieve tension, and to help the skin to recover quickly.  It helps to reduce the appearance of wrinkles and other skin blemishes, and promotes a glowing, youthful complexion. But, it does so much more.

Helichrysum oil promotes healthy liver function, helping the body to detoxify.  It promotes circulation and supports localized blood flow, making it a powerful tool in support of your overall health and wellness.

Helichrysum italicum, a flowering, plant of the daisy family Asteraceae, is a small perennial herb, with narrow, silver leaves, and flowers that form a cluster of golden yellow, ball-shaped blossoms.  The name “Helichrysum” is derived from the Greek “helios” meaning sun and “chrysos” meaning gold, referring to the color of the flowers.

Helichrysum oil we offer, is steam distilled from the flower cluster of the Helichrysum italicum plant, yielding an oil with an herbaceous, honey, hay aroma.  Helichrysum italicum is the most commonly distilled strain, because of its high concentration of aromatic constituents, as compared to other strains.

Helichrysum has been used for its many health benefits since ancient Greece.  It is best known for its ability to help the skin quickly recover, helping to reduce the appearance of wrinkles and other blemishes, while promoting a glowing, youthful complexion.  It promotes healthy liver function, helping to detoxify the body.  It also supports localized blood flow and promotes circulation.  Helichrysum also helps to relieve tension.

Helichrysum oil contains active constituents that have not been identified in any other essential oil.  These chemical constituents include:

  • up to 10% diketones,
  • up to 30% sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, and
  • up to 50% esters.

Together, these create a powerful chemical profile, making it an ideal essential oil for many personal applications.  It is a wonderful oil that is highly prized by essential oils users.

Quality helichrysum oil is quite rare.  Because it is almost exclusively wild-crafted (due to the difficulty of maintaining active constituent levels in domestic strains), it tends to be hard to find.

How to use –

  • Apply directly to wrinkles, or other blemishes, to reduce their appearance and help the skin recover more quickly.
  • Take internally, as part of a natural cleansing regimen, to promote healthy liver function and help to detoxify the body.
  • Apply topically, to support localized blood flow and promote circulation.
  • Massage into temples and the back of the neck, to help relieve tension.

47. Juniper Berry

Juniper berry has a rich history of traditional uses. It acts as a natural cleansing and detoxifying agent, both internally and externally, and supports healthy kidney and urinary function. It may benefit problematic skin areas, and helps to relieve tension and stress.

Juniper berry oil is derived from the berries of the coniferous Juniperus communis tree, which are steam distilled, and yields an essential oil with a balsamic, clean, woody, spicy aroma, which is high in the chemical constituents of α-pinene, sabinene. The scent has a calming effect, that helps relieve tension and stress. When diffused, juniper berry helps to cleanse and purify the air.

It should be noted that other essential oil companies typically offer an oil that is distilled from the branches and berries of the Juniperus communis tree. This produces an oil with a very different chemical profile and therapeutic benefits.

How to use –

  • Add 1 – –2 drops to water or citrus drinks, as part of a natural cleansing regimen.
  • Apply 1 drop to problematic skin areas, to promote a clear, healthy complexion.
  • Diffuse with citrus oils, to freshen and purify the air and to lessen stress.

48. Lime

Lime

Lime oil has a distinctively sharp, citrusy scent, making it a favorite among essential oils.  It has stimulating and refreshing properties, that can affect mood, promoting emotional balance and a sense of well-being.  It supports healthy immune function, and can be used as an aromatic, topical and internal cleanser.

Limes are frequently used in entrées and beverages for their fresh, citrus flavor.  In the 18th century, British sailors drank lime juice daily, to prevent scurvy while at sea, thus giving British seamen the nickname “Limeys”.

Lime oil is cold pressed (expressed) from the rind (peel) of the Citrus aurantifolia fruit, yielding an oil with a citrus, tart, sweet aroma, with a high content of d-limonene, α- & β-pinenes and γ-terpinene.  It is refreshing and stimulating, in both aroma and taste.

Lime essential oil supports healthy immune function.  Due to its high limonene content, it provides excellent internal cleansing benefits, and can be diffused to help cleanse the air.  It’s also an effective and natural surface cleaner.

Lime is also known for its ability to promote emotional balance and a sense of well-being, positively affecting mood, with its stimulating and refreshing properties.

How to use –

  • Diffuse, to cleanse the air and uplift your mood.
  • Put some lime on a cotton pad, to help remove grease spots and sticker residue.
  • Add a drop of lime to your drinking water, for enhanced flavor and antioxidants.
  • Add 1 drop to your facial cleanser or shampoo, for added cleansing properties.

49. Marjoram

Marjoram oil

Marjoram oil is valued for its calming properties and positive effect on the nervous system.  It also supports a healthy respiratory system, and has benefits for the cardiovascular system.  It promotes gastrointestinal health, purifies the skin and soothes tired, stressed muscles.

Marjoram, also referred to as “wintersweet” or “joy of the mountains”, is one of the most common herbs found in kitchens around the world.  In antiquity, the Romans knew marjoram as the “herb of happiness”; to the Greeks, it was the “joy of the mountains”.  It has long been used in culinary dishes, imparting a unique flavor to soups, stews, dressings and sauces; in Germany, this herb is known as the “Goose Herb”, for its traditional use in roasting geese.

In traditional Austrian medicine, marjoram was used to promote gastrointestinal health and to purify the skin.  In modern applications, marjoram is valued for its calming properties and for its positive effect on the nervous system.  It also soothes tired, stressed muscles and supports a healthy respiratory system, and has benefits for the cardiovascular system.

Marjoram oil is steam distilled from the leaves of the Origanum majorana plant, yielding an oil with a warm, herbaceous, woody scent, with a high content of linalool and terpinen-4-ol.

Marjoram is closely related to oregano, and has similar properties.  It is certified GRAS by the FDA, so it is safe to ingest.

How to use –

  • Apply to the back of the neck, for its calming properties and positive effect on the nervous system.
  • Diffuse, before going to bed, for a better night’s sleep, or drop some on a cotton ball and place it near your pillow.
  • Use marjoram oil in place of dried marjoram herbs.  Usually 1 drop of essential oil is equivalent to 2 teaspoons of dried herbs.
  • Diffuse, to promote healthy respiratory function.

50. Melaleuca

Melaleuca

Melaleuca alternifolia, more commonly know as tea tree oil, has been renowned for its cleansing and rejuvenation effect on the skin, promoting a clear, healthy complexion and soothing minor skin irritations.  It is an ingredient of many soaps, creams, lotions, deodorants, disinfectants and air fresheners.  It is one of the most powerful oils in promoting healthy immune function, and can be used to protect against environmental and seasonal threats.

Melaleuca alternifolia is more commonly recognized by the name tea tree oil, so named by Captain James Cook (1728 – 1779), because he often used it in his tea.

Melaleuca alternifolia oil is steam distilled from the leaves of the tree, yielding an oil with a crisp, herbaceous, green, leathery aroma, and high in the chemical compounds of α- & γ-terpinenes and terpinen-4-ol.

Composed of more than ninety-two different aromatic compounds, melaleuca has limitless beneficial applications.  For many centuries, the Aborigines of Australia would crush the leaves of the M. alternifolia tree and inhale the oil, to protect themselves against environmental and seasonal threats, and apply the leaves directly to the skin, to rejuvenate the skin and soothe minor skin irritations.  Modern science has only begun to investigate its potential uses.

Today, research is validating the use of this extraordinary natural oil for personal consumption.

Melaleuca is best known for its purifying properties.  It has long been renowned for its cleansing and rejuvenating effects on the skin.  It is also soothes minor skin irritations, promoting a clear, healthy complexion.  When diffused, melaleuca oil helps to purify and freshen the air and, taken internally, when seasonal threats are high, it protects against environmental and seasonal threats, promoting healthy immune function.  Melaleuca can also be used on surfaces, throughout the home, to protect against environmental threats.

How to use –

  • For occasional skin irritations, apply 1 – –2 drops of melaleuca essential oil onto affected area.
  • Add 1– – 2 drops to water, citrus drinks or veggie caps, to enhance immunity.
  • Combine 1 – –2 drops with your facial cleanser or moisturizer, for added cleansing properties, or apply to skin after shaving, to prevent razor burn.
  • Add a few drops to a spray bottle, with water, and use on surfaces, to protect against environmental threats.

51. Melissa

Also known as lemon balm, melissa oil supports and helps to boost a healthy immune system, helps to calm tension and nerves, promotes emotional and cognitive health, helping to initiate a restful night’s sleep, and addresses the occasional stomach discomfort.

One of the rarest and most expensive essential oils, it is also one of the most commonly adulterated of the oils.

Also known as lemon balm, melissa has a delightful, light, lemon-like scent.  This fresh, sweet, citrus-like fragrance, which was known to attract bees, led to its name.  Melissa comes from the Greek word μέλισσα (melissa), meaning “honey bee”, which in turn comes from μέλι (meli), meaning “honey”.

Melissa essential oil is steam distilled from the fresh flowering tops, leaves and stems of the Melissa officinalis plant, yielding an oil with a distinctive citrus, herbaceous aroma, rich in the chemical compounds of geranial, germacrene, neral, caryophyllene.  It was an important ingredient in Carmelite water, distilled in France since 1611, by members of the Carmelite Order.

Because the Melissa officinalis plant has an oil yield of less than 1/10 of 1%, melissa is one of the most rare and expensive oils.  It takes three tons of Melissa officinalis to produce one pound of oil.  Quality melissa oil, when you can get it, sells for $9,000 to $15,000 per kilo; which means that it is one of the most commonly adulterated of the essential oils.

Melissa has a wide range of health benefits and uses.  It supports and helps to boost a healthy immune system; it helps to calm tension and nerves; diffusing melissa at night helps to initiate a restful sleep, and promotes emotional and cognitive health.  It is also good at addressing occasional stomach discomfort.  It is also used as a flavor in teas and ice cream, as well as with some fish dishes.

Primary benefits of melissa oil

How to use –

  • Add 1-–2 drops to herbal tea, to address occasional stomach discomfort.
  • Diffuse at night, or rub on forehead, shoulders or chest, to cognitive well-being.
  • Place 1-–2 drops under the tongue, to support and help boost a healthy immune system.

52. Myrrh

Myrrh has been used in many ways, throughout history.  In ancient Egypt, it was used for everything from meditation to embalming and religious ceremonies.

Modern herbalists frequently recommend myrrh for its cleansing properties, especially for the mouth and throat.  It is also excellent for the skin, soothing it and promoting a smooth, youthful-looking complexion.  It also promotes emotional balance and a sense of well-being.

Myrrh oil has been used for centuries, both for its internal and external health benefits.  Referenced in the Bible as the Balm of Gilead, it has been used throughout history as a perfume,  embalming to religious ceremonies.

Ancient records show that myrrh was deemed so valuable that, at times, it was valued at its weight in gold. Myrrh oil is steam distilled from the gummy resin of the small, thorny Commiphora

myrrha tree, yielding an oil with a hot, smoky, herbaceous, woody, dry aroma, high in the chemical compounds of myrrh sesquiterpenoid and curzerene.

How to use –

  • Add 1–-2 drops to toothpaste, for added cleansing benefits and to promote oral health.
  • Diffuse, to help promote emotional balance and a sense of well-being.
  • Add to your lotion or moisturizer, to soothe the skin and promote a smooth, youthful-looking complexion.

53. Oregano

Oregano is one of the most potent and powerful essential oils, and has been used for centuries, in traditional medicine, for its cleansing and immune-boosting properties.  Hippocrates, the father of medicine, used oregano as a cleansing agent, as well as for digestive and respiratory support.

The primary chemical components of oregano are carvacol and thymol, both in the phenols group, which possess purifying and antioxidant properties.

Oregano oil is steam distilled from the stems and leaves of the Origanum vulgare plant, yielding an oil with a heavy, herbaceous, sharp, green, camphoraceous, spicy, pungent aroma that really lingers.  The Origanum vulgare plant is a member of the Lamiaceae (also called Labiatae, or mint) family of flowering plants.  The oil contains phenolic acids and flavonoids, making it an outstanding antioxidant.

No one would ever confuse oregano with perfume; however, it is used as a fragrance component in soaps, colognes and perfumes, especially fragrances for men.  But, what it lacks as a perfume, it more than makes up for in other important ways.

Oregano, in addition to being a popular cooking spice, supports healthy digestion.  When diffused, oregano acts as an enhancer and equalizer in essential oil blends, and can help maintain healthy respiratory function.

One drop, taken daily, can help enhance healthy immune function; oregano should be taken more frequently, when seasonal threats are high, or as needed, to further enhance immunity.

Due to its high phenol content, caution should be taken when inhaling or diffusing oregano oil; only one to two drops is needed.  Additionally, oregano should be diluted with carrier oil, when applied to the skin.

Oregano oil is certified by the FDA as GRAS; however, it is a very “hot” oil, so dilution is a carrier oil is recommended for ingestion.

How to use –

  • Take one drop daily, to enhance immunity, when seasonal threats are high.
  • Rub oregano essential oil and fractionated coconut oil on the bottom of your feet, to help enhance your immune system.
  • For use in the bath, dilute 1-3 drops of oregano oil in body gel or shampoo, and add it to the bath water.  Never just add this oil to the water, as it will “puddle” on the surface and can burn sensitive tissues.
  • Put one drop, in place of dried oregano, in spaghetti sauce, pizza sauce or on a roast.
  • Put 10 drops in a 16-ounce spray bottle, with water, for a surface spray.
  • As an cleanser, the diluted oil can be used in cloths, to wipe down kitchen and bathroom counter tops.

54. Petitgrain

Petitgrain

Petitgrain Citrus aurantium – essential oil is derived from the bitter orange tree, which has a long history of use in traditional health practices. Historically, Petitgrain essential oil has been used for cleaning purposes and it has been used internally to support healthy immune system and nervous system function. Emerging scientific evidence provides support for these traditional and other uses. There are three essential oils derived from the bitter orange tree. Petitgrain is distilled from the leaves and twigs of the tree, Neroli essential oil is distilled from the blossoms, and Bitter Orange oil is produced by cold pressing the rinds of the fruits.

Petitgrain is widely used in the perfume industry, giving body sprays, fragrances, lotions, and colognes a fresh, herbaceous note that is popular among both women and men. Petitgrain is produced in Paraguay.

Main Chemical Components are Linalyl acetate, linalool, alpha-terpineol.

How to use –

  • Combine Douglas Fir with Wild Orange, Lemon, or Bergamot in a diffuser to freshen the air, uplift mood, and promote a sense of focus
  • Add 1 drop to facial cleanser, bar soap, or body wash for added cleansing benefits and an invigorating aroma
  • Diffuse 2–3 drops Douglas Fir with 2–3 drops Eucalyptus, or rub into hands and inhale deeply to promote feelings of clear airways and easy breathing
  • Combine with 1–2 drops of Wintergreen for a relaxing massage experience.

55. Roman Chamomile

Used widely for its therapeutic, calming effect on the skin, mind and body, Roman chamomile is especially soothing to the systems of the body, and helps to support healthy immune system function.

The Anthemis nobilis plant grows close to the ground, reaching only up to a foot in height.  It has gray-green leaves, flowers that resemble a daisy and smells like apple.  The plant has been nicknamed the “plant’s physician”, because it has positive effects on plants growing nearby.  Ancient Romans used the chamomile for mental clarity and courage during war.

The oil is steam distilled from the flowers of the small, white, daisy-like flower of the Anthemis nobilis plant, yielding an oil with a floral, sweet, herbaceous aroma, high in the chemical compounds of isobutyl angelate and isoamyl angelate.

The most versatile of the chamomiles, Roman chamomile oil is most commonly used in teas; but it can also be found in face creams, drinks, hair dyes, shampoos and perfumes.

With a therapeutic, calming effect on all types of skin, Roman chamomile oil is used extensively in Europe, in skin preparations for young and old alike.  Its calming effect on both the mind and body makes it especially valuable for restless children

How to use –

  • Add 1 – –2 drops to herbal teas or hot drinks, to help calm the body and mind.
  • Diffuse or apply to bottoms of feet, at bedtime, to soothe body systems and prepare them for a restful night’s sleep.
  • Apply to the bottoms of the feet, to support healthy immune system function.

56. Siberian Fir

The Siberian fir tree – Abies sibirica -is a tall, light in color, conifer tree native to Russia and Canada.

Siberian fir essential oil has a refreshing, woody scent that is known for its calming and relaxing properties. With a fresh, woody scent, can help balance your emotions and soothe anxious feelings. Siberian Fir has a unique chemical composition that is predominately bornyl acetate, which provides a majority of the easing benefits of this essential oil.

Siberian fir can be very soothing to the skin, making it an ideal essential oil to add to a comforting massage. When diffused, Siberian Fir can help promote feelings of easy breathing, while calming the emotions and providing a grounding effect. Main Chemical Component is bornyl acetate.

 

How to use –

  • After strenuous activity, massage into skin for soothing comfort.
  • When working through difficult circumstances at home, work, or school, diffuse Siberian Fir to help reduce stress.
  • Apply topically to skin to help soothe minor skin irritations.
  • Inhale deeply and experience the refreshing aroma.

57. Spearmint

SpearmintMentha spicata – is a perennial plant that grows 11–40 inches tall and flourishes in temperate climates. It is widely used in gums, candies, and dental products for its minty taste, and to promote fresh breath.

Spearmint has been used internally for centuries for its digestive benefits. Its sweet, refreshing aroma is cleansing and uplifting, making it ideal to evoke a sense of focus and positive mood. Spearmint is very different from Peppermint, making it a milder option to use topically on children and those with sensitive skin. In cooking, Spearmint is frequently used in salads, drinks, and desserts, but it can also be used in homemade salad dressings and to marinate meats.

Main Chemical Components are Carvone and limonene.

 

How to use –

  • Diffuse to uplift mood.
  • Apply to toothbrush before brushing teeth for fresh breath.
  • Add a drop or two to any dessert, drink, salad, or entrée for flavoring and to promote digestion.
  • For occasional stomach upset, add 1–2 drops to water and drink.

58. Spikenard

SpikenardNardostachys jatamansi, a flowering plant of the Valerian family, is native to high altitudes in the sub-alpine and alpine regions of the Himalayan mountains.

Spikenard essential oil is steam distilled from the roots of the plant and has been valued for centuries, traditionally used to anoint people of high honor and in the Ayurvedic health practices of India. Historically, Spikenard was used to uplift mood and promote relaxation.

Spikenard promotes clean, healthy skin. Today, the oil is commonly used in perfumes and relaxing massage oils for its woody, musty scent. Spikenard oil is from Nepal.

 

How to use –

  • Diffuse or apply one to two drops to back of neck or to temples to promote feeling of calmness and relaxation.
  • Create a personalized fragrance by combining Spikenard with Clove, Cypress, Frankincense, Geranium, Juniper Berry, Lavender, Myrrh, Wild Orange, Rose, and Vetiver.
  • Combine with a hydrating cream to soften and smooth skin.
  • Add one to two drops to your favorite cleanser or antiaging product to promote healthy, glowing skin.

59. Thyme

Thyme, familiar to most as a common seasoning for cooking, produces and essential oil that has valuable cleansing and purifying properties.  It is also notable for its broad-spectrum activity for winter health.

Thymus vulgaris (common thyme) is a flowering plant in the Lamiaceae (mint) family.  It is native to southern Europe, from the western Mediterranean to southern Italy.

Thymus vulgarisis a generally upright, bushy, woody-based perennial, primarily grown as a culinary herb in herb gardens.  Growing from ½ to 1 foot tall, and about the same in width, its stems are clothed with tiny, linear to elliptic, pointed, gray-green leaves which are distinctively revolute, with small, highly aromatic, grey-green leaves and, in early summer, clusters of showy purple or pink flowers.

The leaves of the Thymus vulgaris are frequently used — fresh or dried — as a seasoning in a variety of culinary applications, including soups, stews, sauces, meat and fish dishes.

Thought to impart courage to its bearer, ladies of the Middle Ages would give thyme to knights and warriors, before they went into battle.  During this same period, it was often placed beneath pillows, to help promote a peaceful sleep and to ward off nightmares.  The ancient Greeks used thyme in their baths, and burned it as an incense in their temples, while the Egyptians used it in their embalming rites.

Thyme oil is steam distilled from the leaves of the Thymus vulgaris plant, yielding an oil with a warm, herbaceous, floral, powdery aroma, high in the chemical compound of thymol.

Thyme oil, like the fresh or dried herb, is excellent in cooking; but the oil also provides cleansing and clarifying effects for the skin; however, due to its high phenol content, thyme should always be diluted with  carrier oil,  before application.

Thyme oil is composed of specific chemical compounds that produce broad-spectrum activity, in promoting winter-time health.  Including thyme essential oil in food dishes, or consuming one to two drops a day, will promote a healthy immune system, when seasonal threats are high.

How to use –

  • Diffusion: Use three to four drops in the diffuser of your choice.
  • Internal use: Dilute one drop in 4 fl oz of liquid.
  • Topical use: Dilute one to two drops with carrier oil, then apply to desired area.  See additional precautions below.

60. Vetiver

Native to Europe, Carrot seed oil is a popular ingredient in skincare products around the world. It has a naturally high SPF value and can protect skin against many infections and pollution.

Best suited for : Mature/Acne prone/ Irritated/Normal skin

How to use –

  • Skin rejuvenating mask : Mix 1tbsp bentonite clay + 1tbsp aloe vera gel + 2 drops carrot seed oil and apply.
  • Even out complexion : Apply a few drops on your skin regularly.
  • Lighten and revive aging skin : Mix equal amount of carrot seed and pomegranate seed oil and apply a few drops everyday.
  • Glowing skin scrub : Mix 2tbsp coconut oil + 2tbsp raw honey + 4tbsp coffee ground + 8 drops carrot seed oil + 6 drops tea tree essential oil.

61. White Fir

White fir is derived from the soft needles of the Abies alba tree.  It is a favorite among essential oil users, for its ability to provide soothing support to sore muscles and joints, while supporting respiratory function and clear breathing.  Its scent evokes feelings of stability, energy and empowerment, energizing the body and mind, while helping the body relax.

The white fir (Abies alba) tree is a popular source of wood for construction, because of its combination of strength, versatility and beauty.  It’s also a popular choice for Christmas trees.  Native Americans used white fir as a building material, as well as in their traditional medicine, specifically to promote healthy respiratory function.

White fir oil is steam distilled from the needles of the Abies alba tree, yielding an oil with a distinctively clean, crisp, woody, powdery aroma, and a high concentration of the chemical constituents of l-limonene and β-pinene.

White fir essential oil is most noted for its soothing support to sore muscles and joints, as well as its support for respiratory function and clear breathing.  Aromatically, white fir evokes feelings of stability, energy and empowerment.  It energizes the mind and body, but can also help the body to relax.

How to use –

  • Apply to cold, sore muscles and joints, during winter time.
  • Diffuse, or apply to chest, to promote clear breathing.
  • Add 1 – –2 drops to a hot bath, to relax the body, and breathe in white fir’s emotionally-stabilizing aroma.
  • Diffuse, to energize the mind and evoke feelings of energy, stability and empowerment at work.

62. Wild Orange

Wild orange oil is one of the most powerful and aromatic of the oils, with a citrusy aroma that is truly unique — and wonderful, beyond words.  It is energizing and revitalizing, and an effective tool for uplifting the mind and body.

Wild orange oil is sourced from the Dominican Republic, cold pressed (expressed) from the rinds (peels) of the Citrus sinensis fruit, yielding an oil with a sweet, fresh, citrus aroma, high in monoterpenes, including the chemical compound d-limonene.

Wild orange oil is uplifting to the mind and body.  It is high in antioxidants, helping to maintain overall health and protect against seasonal and environmental threats.  It is ideal to enhance immunity when seasonal threats are high.

Wild orange is also a powerful cleanser and purifying agent.  It can be taken daily, to cleanse the body, or used on surfaces, as a natural cleaner.  Diffusing wild orange will energize and uplift the mind and body, while purifying the air.  It also enhances any essential oil blend with a fresh, sweet, refreshing aroma.

Wild orange is used extensively as a fragrance component in soaps, detergents, cosmetics and perfumes, and in the food and drinks industry.

How to use –

  • Use in an all-purpose spray, to cleanse and purify surfaces.
  • Add a drop to your water every day, for a burst of flavor and to promote overall health.
  • Use in massage for its uplifting and protective properties.
  • Diffuse, to uplift the mind and body, and to freshen the air.
  • Diffuse in the car on long trips.  It is uplifting to the mind and body, and protects against environmental threats.
  • Use with direct inhalation, to energize the mind and body.  Simply dispense one to two drops of wild orange into the palm of your hand, along with equal parts peppermint and frankincense.  Rub your palms together, then cup them over your face and inhale deeply.  Rub any remaining oil on the back of your neck.

63. Wintergreen

Wintergreen oil has a cool, mint-like fragrance that is readily recognized — if not actually identified — by most people today, due to its use as a flavoring agent in gum, candy and toothpaste.  However, wintergreen has much more to offer, therapeutically.  It soothes achy muscles and joints, and promotes healthy respiratory function.  When diffused, its refreshing and cooling aroma evokes clarity, awareness and concentration.

Wintergreen essential oil is derived from the leaves of a creeping shrub found in coniferous areas.  Growing up to six inches in height, it contains bright red fruit, has oval leaves and small, white bell-shaped flowers.

Wintergreen oil is steam distilled from the small leaves of the Gaultheria procumbens plant, yielding an oil with a sweet, minty, refreshing aroma, high in the chemical compound methyl salicylate, a phenolic ester. While some producers also distill wintergreen oil from the bark of the Gaultheria procumbens tree, the best oil comes from the leaves. Wintergreen and birch are the only plants in the world that contain natural methyl salicylate.

The main chemical component in wintergreen, methyl salicylate, makes this oil very useful for soothing achy muscles and joints.  When diffused, wintergreen promotes healthy respiratory function, and its refreshing and cooling aroma evokes clarity, awareness and concentration.

How to use –

  • Wintergreen has a warming effect, when applied to skin, and is excellent to use in a massage, to soothe sore muscles and joints.  However, a little goes a long way; so use sparingly, and dilute with fractionated coconut oil, to help minimize any possible skin sensitivity.
  • For a soothing bath, add 1– – 2 drops of wintergreen essential oil to warm bath water.  Note: This oil should be added to a bath gel or salts, before adding it to bath water, to protect against “puddling” on sensitive areas of the body.
  • Wintergreen essential oil is not recommended for internal use and should be stored out of reach from children

64. Amyris

A small bushy tree with compound leaves and white flowers which grows wild in thickets all over the island of Haiti.

As a cheap substitute for East Indian sandalwood in perfumes and cosmetics, although it does not have the same rich tenacity; chiefly employed as a fixative in soaps. Limited application in flavouring work, especially liqueurs.

 

 

 

 

65. Angelica Root

*Tall herb with large flower heads carrying clusters of small, ball-like, green-white flowers

*Has photosensitization potential; avoid sunlight exposure after application. Best avoided during pregnancy and while breast-feeding. GRAS status.

 

 

 

 

66. Angelica Seed Essential Oil

Angelica Seed

*Tall herb with large flower heads carrying clusters of small, ball-like, green-white flowers

*No contraindications known. GRAS status.

 

 

 

 

67. Aniseed Essential Oil

Aniseed

*Flowering herb growing 2–3 feet high with white flowers and fern-like leaves

*May cause irritation on highly sensitive skins; a skin patch test is advisable. Best avoided during pregnancy and while breast-feeding. GRAS status.

 

 

 

68. Balsam De Peru Essential Oil

*Evergreen tree growing to 140 feet with large leaves; flowers each produce a single seed that’s 3–4 inches (7–10 cm) long.

*May cause irritation on highly sensitive skins; a skin patch test is advisable. GRAS status.

 

 

 

 

 

69. Basil Linalol Essential Oil

basil linalol

*Bushy annual herb growing up to 2 feet high, with white, pink, or purple flowers

*Best avoided during pregnancy.

 

 

 

 

70. Basil Tulsi Essential Oil

Basil Tulsi

*Shrub growing up to 2 feet with green or purple aromatic leaves and small purple flowers

*May cause irritation on highly sensitive skins; a skin patch test is advisable. Avoid use in baths and showers, and always dilute before use. Avoid during pregnancy and while breast-feeding.

 

 

 

71. West Indian Bay Essential Oil

West Indian Bay

*Evergreen tree growing over 30 feet high with small, highly fragrant leaves, small white flowers, and black berries

*Avoid prolonged use. Can be a skin irritant. Those prone to allergic skin reactions are advised to carry out a skin patch test. Best avoided during pregnancy. GRAS status.

 

 

 

 

 

 

72. Bay Laurel Essential Oil

Bay Laurel

* Evergreen tree growing to 60 feet in height with glossy leaves, creamy-green flowers, and small black berries

*Those prone to allergic skin reactions are advised to carry out a skin patch test. Avoid during pregnancy. GRAS status.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

73. Benzoin Essential Oil

Styrax benzoin resin on a wooden background

*Tree growing up over 80 feet high with green-yellow flowers

*Antidepressant, antiinflammatory, antiseptic, carminative, expectorant, pectoral, vulnerary

 

 

 

 

 

74. Cajuput Essential Oil

– Tall evergreen flowering tree with gray, papery bark and white or green flower spikes

-Muscular aches and pains, rheumatism, muscular injury, chesty cough, bronchitis, colds, sinus problems, acne, rashes, parasitic skin infections, contusions, bruises; stimulating, insect repellent

75. Camphor Essential Oil

Camphor

-Evergreen broadleaf tree growing to 100 feet with rough bark, glossy fragrant leaves, a profusion of white flowers, and black berries

-Avoid during pregnancy and while breast-feeding. White camphor should not be confused with brown or yellow camphors, both of which are toxic.

76. Cananga Essential Oil

*Flowering tree growing to 50 feet with glossy leaves and large, fragrant yellow flowers

*Therapeutic uses: Inflamed skin, physical exhaustion, stress, tension, nervousness, anxiety; perfumery, skin care

*Blends well with: Bergamot, carnation, cinnamon leaf, clary sage, clove bud, eucalyptus lemon, frankincense, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, jasmine, lavandin, lemon, linden blossom, magnolia leaf, mandarin, may chang, neroli, orange (sweet), palmarosa, patchouli, petitgrain, rose absolute, sandalwood, vetiver

77. Caraway Seed Essential Oil

Type of plant: Flowering plant growing up to 2 feet in height, with feathery leaves and umbels of small white or pink flowers

Therapeutic uses: Gastrointestinal conditions, dyspepsia, abdominal spasm, colic, flatulence, intestinal cramp and spasms, irritable bowel syndrome, colitis, diverticulitis, gastric ulceration, allergic rhinitis, bronchitis, coughs, nervousness

Blends well with: Angelica seed, aniseed, bergamot, cardamom, carrot seed, chamomile roman, clary sage, copaiba, coriander seed, dill seed, eucalyptus peppermint, fennel (sweet), galbanum, geranium, grapefruit, mandarin, marjoram (sweet), palmarosa, petitgrain, spearmint

78. Carnation Absolute Essential Oil

Type of plant: Perennial plant with long, thin, silver-gray leaves and pink flowers of various shades with ragged-edged petals

Therapeutic properties: Calmative, relaxant, tonic

Therapeutic uses: Stress, insomnia, overactive mind, workaholism, insecurity, inability to communicate feelings, feeling detached from reality, sense of aloneness; relaxant

Blends well with: Bay (West Indian), benzoin, bergamot, black pepper, cananga, cardamom, chamomile maroc, clove bud, coriander seed, hyacinth, immortelle, jasmine, lemon, linden blossom, magnolia leaf, narcissus, orange (sweet), rose absolute, sandalwood, tuberose, ylang ylang, yuzu

79. Cedarwood, Atlas Essential Oil

Type of plant: An evergreen tree growing to over 100 feet, with wide-spreading branches, needles, and cones

Therapeutic properties: Anti-inflammatory, antiseborrheic, antiseptic, depurative, pectoral, regenerative, restorative, tonic

Therapeutic uses: Chest infection, catarrh, congestion, acne, scalp disorders, cellulite, anxiety, stress, tension, physical exhaustion; detoxifying

Blends well with: Basil linalol, bay (West Indian), bergamot, cardamom, chamomile roman, clary sage, cypress, frankincense, geranium, grapefruit, ho wood, juniper berry, lavender (spike), lemon, lemongrass, marjoram (sweet), orange (sweet), petitgrain, ravintsara, rose absolute, rosemary, rosewood, sandalwood, thyme linalol, ylang ylang

 

 

 

80. Celery Seed Essential Oil

*Type of plant: A wild celery with upright rosettes of green leaves on a tall flowering stem, producing small greenish-white flowers and tiny seeds

Therapeutic properties: Antiseptic, calmative, circulatory, depurative, digestive, sedative

Therapeutic uses: Varicose veins, heavy legs, congestion, constipation, hemorrhoids, stress-related digestive conditions, nervousness, depression; detoxifying

Blends well with: Amyris, angelica root, basil tulsi, cedarwood, clove bud, coriander seed, cypress, fennel (sweet), geranium, ginger, grapefruit, greenland moss, ho wood, immortelle, juniper berry, lemon, lemongrass, myrtle, orange (sweet), petitgrain, rosemary, sage

 

81. Chamomile German Essential Oil

Type of plant: Plant with feathery leaves and white daisy-like flowers with yellow centers

Part used: Flowering tops

Data: Sometimes known as Chamomilla recutita or Matricaria chamomilla, the herb is dried before distillation, and the blue color is due to chamazulene being produced during the distillation process. The name matricariacomes from the Latin matrix, meaning “womb,” because of the plant’s widespread use by women for gynecological conditions and during childbirth. The herb is an ingredient in some French liqueurs.

82. Chamomile Maroc Essential Oil

Type of plant: Perennial herb with daisy-like yellow flowers and hairy leaves

Part used: Flowering tops

Data: Although the flower of Ormenis looks like a typical chamomile, it’s a different species and has quite different therapeutic qualities. When buying any chamomile, it’s important to look at the botanical name and ensure it is the chamomile you seek. This chamomile is sometimes referred to as chamomile mixta or wild chamomile. There is also a tansy (Tanacetum annuum) that’s sometimes called Moroccan chamomile, but this isn’t a chamomile at all.

83. Cistus/Labdanium/Rockrose Essential Oil

Type of plant: Bush growing to 10 feet in height and having large, fragrant, white flowers

Part used: Fresh flowering plant, flowers, young branches, and leaves/gum

Data: There is a great deal of confusion regarding this essential oil because the plant it comes from (often called rockrose) is processed in so many ways — each producing a different essential oil. The essential oil referred to here is produced by steam distillation from the fresh fragrant flowers and leafy branches. This is an entirely different oil from one made in the following ways: (a) The leaves and twigs are boiled in water, producing a gum on the surface; this is skimmed off and dried; the result is the crude gum, which is steam distilled. (b) Oil is steam distilled directly from the leaves and twigs and smells of pine. (c) A concrete, or absolute, is processed differently, again from the leaves and twigs, using a solvent. All these oils will have Cistus ladaniferus as their botanical source, but will be entirely different essential oils. To confuse things further, there is a flower essence called rockrose, which is actually from the plant Helianthemum canadense. When purchasing the essential oil of cistus, check that it’s produced by steam distillation.

84. Damiana Essential Oil

Type of plant: A small aromatic shrub with dark-green leaves and small, fragrant, bright-yellow flowers and small, sweet-smelling fruits

Part used: Leaves

Data: Damiana leaves have a long history of medicinal use, and it is also used to flavor beverages. The reputation of damiana as an aphrodisiac derives from various indigenous people’s traditional use of the shrub, and now several patents have been awarded for its use in medications to enhance the sexual experience.

85. Davana Essential Oil

Type of plant: Small herbaceous plant that grows to around 2 feet in height, with downy silvery-white leaves, small yellow flowers, and tiny seeds

Part used: Leaves and flowering tops

Data: In India the flowers are cultivated for garlands to be used in ceremonies and for essential oil production. The plant has a spiritual association with the Hindu god Shiva, and the blossoms are offered as decorations for the altars and are used in traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine. The essential oil is used in perfumes and fragrances, due to its unique fruity odor. In some parts of the world davana is used as a flavoring ingredient in beverages and baking.

 

86. Dill Seed Essential Oil

Type of plant: Tall herb with green feathery leaves and a large flower head with many small yellow flowers and small seeds

Part used: Seeds

Data: Dill has been used for thousands of years in cooking and in medicine and has been an integral part of herb gardens since the Middle Ages. Dill is still a part of many European pharmacopeias. The main ingredient of babies’ gripe water for colic is dill. The recipe for cucumbers pickled in dill was first made for King Charles I in 1640.

87. Elemi Essential Oil

Type of plant: Tall evergreen tree with glossy, dark-green leaves, yellow flowers and olive-like fruits

Part used: Gum resin

Data: The tree trunk is cut in long horizontal lines, from which the white gum resin exudes profusely and is collected daily or weekly, depending on the age of the tree. Most often the gum is exported to Europe, where it is distilled. The tree, known as the canary tree, is native to the Philippines. Also known as Manila elemi. Long used as an ingredient in incense and for its medicinal uses, elemi was introduced into the European pharmacopeias in the sixteenth century and was said to heal wounds and broken bones. Elemi was once added to artists’ lacquers and varnish.

88. Eucalyptus Lemon Essential Oil

Type of plant: Evergreen tree growing over 100 feet in height with a smooth, blotchy, white, pink, or copper-colored trunk, slim leaves, fluffy, white flowers, and reddish-black glossy seeds

Part used: Leaves and twigs

Data: Also known as lemon-scented gum, or spotted gum, the tree is native to Queensland in northeastern Australia, although it has been extensively exported over the years. In oil production, the tree is sometimes cut back to encourage new growth because most oil is concentrated in the new leaves. The wood is used in situations requiring strength and flexibility, such as in ship building, bridge construction, flooring, handles of shovels and picks, and so on. The tree is also valued because it attracts bees and facilitates honey production.

 

89. Eucalyptus Peppermint Essential Oil

Type of plant: Tree growing to 60 feet in height with a furrowed gray bark and broader leaves than other eucalyptus varieties, with small fluffy flowers

Part used: Leaves and twigs

Data: Two species of Australian eucalyptus are known as eucalyptus peppermint, and the oil most commonly used in aromatherapy is Eucalyptus dives. The other, Eucalyptus piperita, was known as the Sydney Peppermint and is native to New South Wales. In 1790 the British “Surgeon to the First Fleet,” Dr. John White, published his Journal of a Voyage to New South Wales, in which he states that he personally distilled essential oil from Eucalyptus piperita in 1788, making it the earliest known eucalyptus distillation. Eucalyptus dives is native to the coastal regions of New South Wales and Victoria and can flower and fruit when only six feet in height. Known as broad-leafed peppermint, this species was used by native Aborigines as a medicine, especially in cases of fever, when the smoke is wafted over the person. It’s in some pharmaceutical preparations, mouthwashes, and veterinary medicines.

90. Eucalyptus Radiata Essential Oil

Type of plant: Tree growing to 100 feet with black bark at the lower level and smooth bark at the top, with thin, lance-shaped leaves and numerous flowers

Part used: Leaves and twigs

Data: The natural habitat of this tree is along banks of creeks or rivers and coastal mountain ranges in New South Wales, Australia. The tree is known as river white gum and has more oil glands in its leaves than other eucalyptus species. The first known record of Eucalyptus radiata distillation dates to 1898, although a Melbourne pharmacist was apparently using it decades before this. Today Eucalyptus radiata is considered the most appropriate eucalyptus oil for general aromatherapy use

91. Galbanium Essential Oil

Type of plant: Tall plant that can grow up to 6 feet high with thick stalks and large flower heads covered in small, yellow, seed-bearing flowers, reminiscent of fennel

Part used: Gum resin

Data: The gum is harvested from an outgrowth on the root collar of the plant, which has to be deliberately exposed before scoring, allowing the gum resin to exude. It hardens into brownish tears over a couple of days and is then collected. Further cuts at the site release more gum resin, and the process is repeated. Galbanum is one of the ingredients in the anointing oil instructions given to Moses on Mount Sinai. Hippocrates is known to have used it as a medicine, while Pliny ascribed magical powers to it. In the Middle East, galbanum is still used in medicine, perfumery, incense, and purification ceremonies.

92. Geranium, Bulgarian Essential Oil

Type of plant: Fast-growing, self-rooting perennial plant growing to 2 feet high with pink flowers

Part used: Leaves and stems

Data: Often called Bulgarian geranium or geranium Robert because the plant is in the Robertium subgenus of the genus Geranium. The plant is also called bigroot geranium or rock cranesbill, as it grows in rocky, shaded areas and is found on almost all of Bulgaria’s mountain ranges. Zdravetz is known as a health bringer in Bulgaria, where it has long been part of the traditional herbal healing system.

93. Ginger Lily Root Essential Oil

Type of plant: Hardy perennial with horizontal root stock and large glossy leaves, growing to 3 feet high with a single stalk atop, which is a dense spike of fragrant white flowers with long, thin petals

Part used: Rhizome

Data: Native to China, Nepal, Bhutan, northern India, Thailand, and Myanmar. Grows at altitudes between 3,500 and 9,000 feet. Used in Ayurvedic medicine for multiple purposes. The dried and powdered rhizomes are used in incense production, and also in cooking.

94. Greenland Moss Essential Oil

Type of plant: Woody, perennial evergreen shrub growing to 1 meter high, with leathery, underfolding leaves, hairy on the underside, and a single stalk atop with clusters of white flowers

Part used: Leaves

Data: Often wild-crafted. Although called moss, the plant is not at all moss-like. It grows well in moist soil such as peatland and is also found in coniferous forests with open canopy. A tea is made from the leaves, hence the name Labrador tea. The leaves are also placed in closets to deter insects and among grain to deter animal and insect pests. Canadian First Nations people have used the plant for a wide variety of medicinal purposes.

95. Hop Essential Oil

Type of plant: Perennial climbing plant with male and female cone-shaped strobiles, made up of imbricated scales

Part used: Female strobiles

Data: The best known use for hops is as an ingredient in beer. It has phytoestrogenic properties, which account for its traditional use as an aid to encourage breast milk and, some say, is the cause of the “beer belly” effect. Hops have been known as a sedative for hundreds of years, and hop pillows to aid sleep are still sold the world over.

 

96. Ho Wood Essential Oil

Type of plant: Evergreen broadleaf tree growing to 100 feet high with rough bark, glossy fragrant leaves, a profusion of white flowers, and black berries

Part used: Bark, leaves, and twigs

Data: Widely used in perfumery as an alternative for rosewood essential oil since rosewood became an endangered tree. Native to China, Taiwan, Vietnam, and Japan. There are different species of this tree and they’re structurally very similar, so differentiation is established by analyzing the essential oil chemotype produced by the leaves. These fall into five groups: linalool, 1,8-cineole, camphor, borneol, and nerolidol. The camphor subtype has long been an important commercial source of natural camphor. The 1,8-cineole subtype produces ravintsara essential oil. Ensure that the chemotype linalool is purchased when looking for ho wood

 

97. Hyssop Decumbens Essential Oil

Type of plant: Herbaceous plant growing to 2 feet high with leafy stems and spikes of purplish-blue flowers

Part used: Leaves and flowering tops

Data: The essential oil is distilled from fresh plant material in late summer. Hyssop was sacred to the ancient Hebrews, who used it to purify temples, and it’s still used at Passover as one of the “bitter herbs.” Hyssop’s medicinal properties were recognized also by the ancient Greeks, who used it for chest complaints and to increase blood circulation. Also used by the Romans and throughout the Middle Ages in Europe, where it was a common sight in herb gardens.

 

98. Immortelle Essential Oil

Type of plant: Bushy herb with very small, velvety leaves off long stems, each with a cluster of small yellow flowers

Part used: Flowering-head clusters

Data: The flowers are comprised of dry bracts rather than petals and last a very long time — hence the name everlasting. Listed as a medicinal herb in many Greek, Roman, and medieval European texts. There are hundreds of helichrysum/ immortelle varieties, but few produce essential oil.

 

99. Jasmine Absolute Essential Oil

Type of plant: Climbing shrub with dark-green leaves and small, star-shaped, highly fragrant, white flowers

Part used: Flowers

Data: The delicate flowers are hand-picked before dawn, when their aroma is most intense, then they’re processed to produce a concrete from which the absolute is obtained. Over a ton of flowers are required to produce 4 pounds of absolute. This is a very labor-intensive process, which accounts for the high price of jasmine. Native to the valleys of the Himalayas in northeast India, the highly fragrant jasmine was brought to Europe by Spanish seafarers in the sixteenth century. When perfumery became an important industry in Grasse, France, jasmine was at its core. The medicinal qualities of jasmine have been utilized for centuries in India, China, and Arabia — the native source of a jasmine variety with fleshier petals, Jasminum sambac. Today, jasmine tea is valued in China, and jasmine flower garlands are offered to guests in India.

100. Lavandin Essential Oil

Type of plant: Shrub-like bush that grows taller than lavender, with three flowering heads on each stem, ranging from grayish-blue to intense purple

Part used: Flowering tops

Data: Also known as Lavandula hybrida, L. hybrida grosso, or L. abrialis, lavandin is a spontaneous hybrid between true lavender and spike lavender. It developed due to insect pollination in the area crossed by the two parent varieties, which is above 500 meters in altitude but below 700 meters. The essential oil has been produced for over 100 years. It should not be confused with lavender, which has therapeutic properties not matched by lavandin.

101. Lavender, Spike Essential Oil

Botanical Name: Lavandula Latifolia
Country of Origin: Provence,France
Extraction Method: Steam distillation of petals
Scent Profile: Spike Lavender is a sharper, more camphoraceous cousin of True Lavender. It has a fresh, spicy, and distinct camphor note to its scent. Spike Lavender is also high in medicinal value but not as sweet and floral compared to True Lavender.
Perfumery Note: Middle

102. Lemon Verbena Essential Oil

Type of plant: Bushy perennial shrub growing to around 6 feet high, with slim lemon-scented leaves and stems carrying spikes of tiny white to light-pink or lilac flowers

Part used: Flowering tops

Data: The leaves are harvested along with the flowers and distilled straight away. Originally from South America, lemon verbena was introduced into Europe by the Spanish in the seventeenth century and now grows widely throughout the world. It’s a popular scented garden shrub, and the leaves are often used in potpourris and herbal pillows.

103. Linden Blossom Essential Oil

Type of plant: Tall deciduous tree growing to 80 feet high with heart-shaped leaves and clusters of small, fragrant, creamy-colored flowers

Part used: Flowers

Data: Commonly known as the lime tree. The flowers are made into a tea, which calms, aids sleep, and helps in cases of nervousness. The honey produced by bees attracted to the flowers is valued for its sedative properties. The tree can live for 800 years, and in Europe avenues of the trees are often found in municipal parks and in the grounds of stately homes.

104. Mangolia Flower Essential Oil

Type of plant: Tree growing to over 50 feet high with large glossy leaves and delicate, highly fragrant white flowers with 12 long, slim petals

Part used: Flowers

Data: The tree is a hybrid and is not found in the wild. In Asia it’s often cultivated as a decorative tree. In China magnolia flowers are used in traditional Chinese medicine and to fragrance tea. Throughout Asia magnolia flowers are offered in temples to mark births and other celebrations. Magnolias in general are some of the oldest plants known, developing before winged insects and so pollinated by the more ancient beetles. Fossils of magnolia date to over 100 million years ago and show it was once growing in Europe, as well as in America and Asia, now its native habitat.

105. Mandarin Essential Oil

Type of plant: Small evergreen tree with small leaves, fragrant white flowers, and orange-colored fruits

Part used: Fruit rind

Data: It’s said that the name mandarin comes from the color of the clothing worn by the officials of the old Chinese empire, the mandarins. The dried rind of the fruit is used in cooking and in traditional Chinese medicine to regulate chi. Mandarin originated in China and Vietnam and spread through Asia, only coming to Europe in the nineteenth century, particularly to the southern tip of Italy. The fruit is pressed to extract the essential oil before being fully ripe. This is a very gentle oil, good for blending and excellent for the more delicate among us, including children and those convalescing.

106. Manuka Essential Oil

Type of plant: Hardy, fast-growing shrub growing to 12 feet high with prickly leaves and small, whitish-pink flowers with a deep pinkish-red center.

Part used: Leaves and end branches

Data: Manuka, a plant native to New Zealand, is becoming known internationally as a very useful essential oil. It’s distilled from both wild and cultivated bushes. In the wild it often grows alongside kanuka, and the plant materials should be separated before distillation into the two essential oils. All parts of the bush have been used by the Maori people as an important part of their indigenous medicinal system. Manuka is said to be the original tea tree; Captain James Cook wrote that it “has a very agreeable bitter taste and flavor when [the leaves] are recent, but loses some of both when they are dried.”

107. Mastic Essential Oil

Type of plant: Hardy, shrub-like evergreen tree growing to around 15 feet high with small red fruits

Part used: Resin

Data: Although native to the Mediterranean area and the Near East, the mastic tree is processed for essential oil on the Greek island of Chios, particularly in seven villages in the southwest collectively known as the Mastichochoria. The tree variety there is Pistacia lentiscus var. chia. The trunk is cut, allowing sap to drop to the ground. This dries and hardens into a translucent form and will return to liquid if allowed to become too warm. Raw mastic is an extremely versatile substance and has been used for thousands of years as a medicine, cosmetic, perfume, and incense, and for food flavoring. It was the world’s first recorded chewing gum, deriving its name perhaps from the Spanish word for “chew” — masticar. The Greeks call the resin mastiha and value it as an addition, when ground, to both sweet and savory dishes. An essential oil is also made from the leaves and twigs.

108. May Chang Essential Oil

Type of plant: Shrubby tree growing to 35 feet high, with slender bright-green leaves and fluffy white or pale-yellow lemon-scented flowers and small pepper-like fruits

Part used: Ripe berries and leaves

Data: Native mostly to mountainous areas of China, Taiwan, and Indonesia but now grown commercially elsewhere. All parts of this tree are used. The fruits are green when unripe, turning red then dark brown when ripe. They’re made into a hot spice in Asia; the flowers are used as flavoring for medicinal tea; while the branches and roots are valued in traditional Chinese medicine. The essential oil is a popular component of citrus-type perfumes. It’s also processed commercially to obtain pure citral

109. Mimosa Absolute Essential Oil

Type of plant: Tall shrubby tree with bipinnate leaves and a profusion of bright-yellow pom-pom shaped flowers and black seed pods

Part used: Flowers, leaves, and twigs

Data: The mimosa shrub, which can grow over 10 feet high, has long been used in the traditional Aboriginal medicine of Australia, where its common name is wattle. In the south of France and Italy, where mimosa thrives well in the wild due to the high temperatures, it’s said to herald the start of spring. The bark was used in the tanning industry for its astringent effects. The flowers and leaves produce this highly perfumed absolute, which is utilized in perfumes and aftershaves. Mimosa is a close relative of cassie.

110. Myrtle Essential Oil

Type of plant: Bushy evergreen shrub-like tree growing to 15 feet high with fragrant leathery leaves, white flowers with tufts of white stamens, and bluish-black berries

Part used: Leaves, twigs, and flowers

Data: The myrtle grown in the French island of Corsica is known as green myrtle. A favorite garden plant due to its aromatic leaves. The essential oil is used in medicines, skin preparations, perfumes, aftershaves, and as food flavouring. Myrtle has long had a reputation as an aphrodisiac, being variously associated with weddings, sexual potency, and marital happiness from Roman times to the present day, from the Levant to Scandinavia.

111. Narcissus Absolute Essential Oil

Type of plant: Perennial bulbous herb with long leaves and white flowers with orange centers trimmed in red

Part used: Flowering heads

Data: It takes 500 kilograms of narcissus flowers to produce 300 grams of absolute, making it one of the most expensive floral fragrances. It grows wild in well-drained and rocky habitats. Narcissus has been a popular ingredient in perfumery since ancient Roman times. The word comes from the Greek narkao, meaning “to be made numb.”

112. Neem Essential Oil

Type of plant: Evergreen tree growing to 60 feet high, with long leaves and fragrant white flowers

Part used: Pulp of fruit and seeds

Data: The neem tree is economically important in India, where it’s used for everything from acne to fevers. All parts of the tree are used medicinally — the bark, leaves, flowers, and seeds. The essential oil is used particularly for skin diseases and to deter lice and parasites; the small branches are used to make toothpicks; and the leaves are pressed between the pages of books to deter mites and used in grain stores to deter insects and pests.

113. Neroli/Orange Blossom Essential Oil

Type of plant: Thorny evergreen tree ranging in size from 10 to 30 feet in height with evergreen leaves, waxy white flowers with tufts of yellow stamens, and small orange fruits

Part used: Blossom

Data: The fragrant flowers of the bitter orange tree are nestled in the leaves and must be carefully hand-picked early in the morning. It takes 220 pounds of flowers to produce 2½ fluid ounces of neroli oil. Highly prized in perfumery. The name neroli was given to the fragrance of orange blossom after it was made fashionable in the seventeenth century by the Princess of Nerola in Italy. Neroli blossom was traditionally used by brides to decorate their hair, as it was associated with purity and marital fidelity. The bitter orange tree, also known as Seville orange, is cultivated for making marmalade and for bitter orange essential oil, which is used in food manufacture and perfumery. The essential oil from the leaves, twigs, and small unripe fruits is called petitgrain.

114. Niaouli Essential Oil

Type of plant: Tree growing to 60 feet high with a peeling white bark and fluffy white “bottle-brush” flowers

Part used: Leaves and twigs

Data: Because there are so many closely related species, this plant is sometimes referred to as true niaouli to avoid confusion. Native to New Caledonia — an island group in the southwest Pacific — as well as Australia and Madagascar. The leaves and twigs are often harvested from wild-growing niaouli trees. Wherever it grows, the tree has long been used in indigenous medicine. Due to the invasive root system, the trees can cause major environmental problems because even when felled they continue to grow from the stumps.

115. Nutmeg Essential Oil

Type of plant: Small evergreen tree growing to around 50 feet high with small, bell-shaped, waxy, creamy-colored flowers and large fruits

Part used: Nut/fruit

Data: Native to the Moluccas Islands in Indonesia, the nutmeg has a long history of use. Wars were fought over access to nutmeg, with the Portuguese trying to keep its source a secret until it was discovered by the Dutch, and then the British, who introduced the plant to the Caribbean, where it is now widely grown. The tree produces nuts after 9 years and is fully productive after 20 years. The fruit opens to reveal a single nut/seed, recognized as nutmeg, around which is a red filamentous material, mace, which is itself distilled into an essential oil. Nutmeg is now distributed around the world and plays an important part in cuisine from the Americas to Asia.

116. Oregano Essential Oil

Oregano is one of the most potent and powerful essential oils, and has been used for centuries, in traditional medicine, for its cleansing and immune-boosting properties.  Hippocrates, the father of medicine, used oregano as a cleansing agent, as well as for digestive and respiratory support.

The primary chemical components of oregano are carvacol and thymol, both in the phenols group, which possess purifying and antioxidant properties.

Oregano oil is steam distilled from the stems and leaves of the Origanum vulgare plant, yielding an oil with a heavy, herbaceous, sharp, green, camphoraceous, spicy, pungent aroma that really lingers.  The Origanum vulgare plant is a member of the Lamiaceae (also called Labiatae, or mint) family of flowering plants.  The oil contains phenolic acids and flavonoids, making it an outstanding antioxidant.

No one would ever confuse oregano with perfume; however, it is used as a fragrance component in soaps, colognes and perfumes, especially fragrances for men.  But, what it lacks as a perfume, it more than makes up for in other important ways.

Oregano, in addition to being a popular cooking spice, supports healthy digestion.  When diffused, oregano acts as an enhancer and equalizer in essential oil blends, and can help maintain healthy respiratory function.

One drop, taken daily, can help enhance healthy immune function; oregano should be taken more frequently, when seasonal threats are high, or as needed, to further enhance immunity.

Due to its high phenol content, caution should be taken when inhaling or diffusing oregano oil; only one to two drops is needed.  Additionally, oregano should be diluted with carrier oil, when applied to the skin.

Oregano oil is certified by the FDA as GRAS; however, it is a very “hot” oil, so dilution is a carrier oil is recommended for ingestion.

How to use –

  • Take one drop daily, to enhance immunity, when seasonal threats are high.
  • Rub oregano essential oil and fractionated coconut oil on the bottom of your feet, to help enhance your immune system.
  • For use in the bath, dilute 1-3 drops of oregano oil in body gel or shampoo, and add it to the bath water.  Never just add this oil to the water, as it will “puddle” on the surface and can burn sensitive tissues.
  • Put one drop, in place of dried oregano, in spaghetti sauce, pizza sauce or on a roast.
  • Put 10 drops in a 16-ounce spray bottle, with water, for a surface spray.
  • As an cleanser, the diluted oil can be used in cloths, to wipe down kitchen and bathroom counter tops.

117. Palmarosa Essential Oil

Type of plant: Tall grass-like plant growing in dense tufts of long, thin, fragrant leaves and small yellow flowers

Part used: Leaves

Data: The long-leafed grass is harvested before its flowers bloom and left for a week to optimize the yield of essential oil before distillation. Previously called Turkish geranium oil or East Indian geranium oil, although the aroma is naturally more a lemony-rose than a geranium. If palmarosa oil is shaken with gum arabic solution and left in the sun, it becomes lighter in color and has a more rose-like aroma and is used to adulterate rose essential oil. Palmarosa is indigenous to India and Nepal, where it’s still collected from wild-grown plants. It’s called Rosha oil in Ayurvedic medicine.

118. Pine Essential Oil

Type of plant: Long-living tree reaching 130 feet with slightly orange-red bark when young, with bluish-green evergreen needles and male and female cones

Part used: Needles on branches

Data: Also known as Scots pine. The oil is used in some medication and men’s toiletries. Pinecones are the source of edible pine kernels. Pines are full of flammable resin, and the branches have been used as torches by native people over a huge area — from the United States to Europe, to China. Pines are extensively cultivated for wood, cellulose, tar, pitch, turpentine, and essential oils.

119. Plai Essential Oil

Type of plant: Flowering plant with tuberous root with long fleshy fibers and large glossy leaves

Part used: Rhizome

Data: The name plai is the Thai word for this plant. The plant is widely used in the traditional medicine systems of Southeast Asia, including in Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia. Plai is of the same botanical family as ginger — although having different properties — and is a relative of galangal.

120. Ravensara Essential Oil

Type of plant: Large, flowering evergreen tree with fragrant bark and dark, aromatic stems and fragrant, glossy leaves

Part used: Leaves

Data: Native to Madagascar but now cultivated elsewhere, this tree produces seeds that are used as a spice known as Madagascan nutmeg, which is used in cooking and in medicines. The dark, smooth evergreen leaves are distilled to produce the oil. Used predominantly by clinical aromatherapists, although now widely available.

121. Ravintsara Essential OIl

Type of plant: Broadleaf evergreen tree growing to 100 feet with rough bark, glossy, fragrant leaves, a profusion of white flowers, and black berries

Part used: Leaves

Data: The large, glossy, leathery leaves are hand picked and distilled within a day. Ravintsara was introduced into Madagascar in the mid-twentieth century from Taiwan. It now grows wild in the rain forests of Madagascar or is cultivated. Despite the botanical name of Cinnamomum camphora, the essential oil from Madagascar has very little camphor within it, instead having a high percentage of 1,8-cineol, between 40% and 65%. Ravintsara has the same botanical name as ho wood, but ho wood oil is completely different, having a very low percentage of 1,8-cineol and instead having a very high percentage of linalool.

122. Rosalina Essential Oil

Type of plant: Tree growing between 10 and 25 feet high with pale, papery bark, short, needle-like leaves, and scented, creamy-white bottle-brush flowers

Part used: Leaves

Data: Native to southeastern Australia and northwest Tasmania, this plant grows well near water, hence its name. It can grow into a tree, although is often pruned into a tall shrub for easier cultivation. As the shoots rise from the roots into thickets, the plant is often used as natural fencing. Rosalina is from the same botanical family as tea tree and is sometimes called lavender tea tree because it seems to have the properties of tea tree yet is calming, like lavender, and sweeter-smelling. Aboriginal people use the leaves and bark in their medicine.

123. Rose Otto Essential Oil

Type of plant: A deciduous bush with thorny stems growing to 6 feet with fragrant pink flowers

Part used: Fresh flower heads

Data: Eighty percent of Rosa damascena essential oil comes from the Kazanlak Valley in Bulgaria, where rose growing was introduced in the seventeenth century. This knowledge may have come from the Persians, who are known to have been distilling rose in Shiraz (present-day Iran) since 1612. Writings of the Persian intellectual Ibn Sīnā (Avicenna) described rose distillation as early as the eleventh century, possibly to produce rose water, along with a small amount of oil. It takes literally millions of rose petals to produce just a few fluid ounces of this highly prized essential oil. The roses are hand-picked very early in the morning, and the roses are distilled immediately. Harvesting is between May and June, when the air in the valley is redolent with the aroma of rose and the distilleries are working night and day to process the roses while they still retain their essential oil.

124. Rosewood Essential Oil

Type of plant: Evergreen tree growing to 120 feet high with thick feathery leaves and red flowers and fruits

Part used: Sawdust and wood chippings

Data: This South American rain forest tree is endangered and now under protection, with only sustainable sources allowed to be harvested. The heartwood of this laurel-family tree was once much prized for furniture production and instrument making. The essential oil is distilled from sawdust and wood chippings created by wood working. The wood is said to have an aroma similar to the rose flower, hence the name. The essential oil is used in perfumery and cosmetics.

125. Sage Essential Oil

Type of plant: Perennial herb with small, gray-silver leaves and erect stems bearing spikes of purple flowers

Part used: Leaves and flowers

Data: Another herb with a long history of use. The word salvia translates from Latin as “alive,” “save,” or “be in good health,” and from the ancient Romans onward many European cultures regarded sage as an essential herb for anyone to have growing nearby so it could be used for medicinal purposes. The term officinalis refers to the officina in monasteries, where the healing herbs were stored. All the classic herbals of history recommended the herb salvia for a variety of purposes, including improving women’s fertility. Today sage leaves are perhaps best known as an ingredient in cooking.

126. Sage, Greek Essential Oil

Type of plant: Bushy perennial herb growing up to 3 feet high with hairy leaves and stems and with pinkish-purple flowers

Part used: Leaves and flowering tops

Data: The young leaves are chosen to be distilled. The plant grows on dry, rocky hillsides all around the Mediterranean, including on the Greek island of Crete. Greek sage was considered sacred by the ancient Greeks, who dedicated it to their god Zeus.

127. Sandalwood Essential Oil

Type of plant: Small tree growing to 30 feet in height with bark that can be red, brown, or black, with long leaves, small red flowers, and small black fruits

Part used: Chipped heartwood and root

Data: Known as East Indian sandalwood or white sandalwood because the heartwood is sometimes white. The tree is harvested when mature at 30–40 years by uprooting it during the rainy season. Production in the traditional growing area of Mysore Province is strictly controlled by the Indian government, which maintains a sustainable growth policy. The sandalwood tree is parasitic in that as a sapling it gathers water and nutrients from the roots of host plants, yet this relationship does not cause damage to the host. Sandalwood has been used in incense, as a perfume, and in medicine for thousands of years. The trees can live for 100 years, and when more abundant they were used to build ever-fragrant temples and carved religious sculptures.

128. Savory, Summer Essential Oil

Type of plant: A hardy annual herb growing to 1 foot high with a central stem off which extend 10 or so branches bearing long, slim leaves, at the axis of which are small pinkish-white flowers and small brown fruits

Part used: Leaves and flowering tops

Data: The word savory is said to derive from the Latin satyrus, meaning “satyr,” a mythological part-human creature notorious for lasciviousness. In other words, savory is an aphrodisiac. It was not only for this use that the Mediterranean herb savory was listed in all pharmacopeias since Roman times, as it is a versatile and useful medicinal herb as well as a culinary and perfumery ingredient.

129. Savory, Winter/Mountain Essential Oil

Type of plant: A perennial herb growing to 3 feet high with branches growing vertically, small, long, slim leaves, and dense spikes of small whitish-purple flowers

Part used: Plant including flowers

Data: Also known as mountain savory, the plant grows well in hilly and mountainous terrain, growing on rocky soil and even between the stones of walls. Used as a culinary herb throughout the Mediterranean.

130. Spruce Essential Oil

Type of plant: Evergreen conifer tree growing to 180 feet high with dark-green needles and male and female cones

Part used: Twigs and needles

Data: Native to Russia, northern Europe, Scandinavia, and the Alps, this tree can live up to 1,000 years. The tree is fast growing and widely used as a raw material to make paper. The tree is often used at Christmas, especially when large trees are required for public spaces.

131. Spruce, Black Essential Oil

Type of plant: Slow-growing evergreen conifer tree growing to 60 feet with blue-green needles and small purplish seed cones

Part used: Twigs and needles

Data: Native throughout Canada. The branches exude an edible gum — the source of spruce gum, the original American chewing gum first sold commercially in the early 1800s. It was introduced to the colonists by people of the First Nations, who also showed how the gum could be used to heal wounds. They also used the needles to make spruce beer, which can be alcoholic or nonalcoholic, to alleviate scurvy during the long winter months when fruits weren’t available

132. Tagetes Essential Oil

Type of plant: Fast-growing annual plant growing up to 2 feet high, depending on the species, with smallish yellow to orange flowers

Part used: Flowers

Data: There are over 50 varieties of the genus Tagates. Native to South America, tagetes is now grown all over the world as a decorative flower, sometimes called African or Mexican marigold. Shamans in Mexico used the plant to induce visions. Extract of tagetes is added to chicken feed to make the egg yolks yellow, and it is used in fish farming to improve the color of trout, salmon, and shrimp. The essential oil distilled from various tagetes species has long been used in perfumery and in the food and beverage industries

133. Tangerine Essential Oil

Type of plant: Small evergreen tree with dark-green leaves, fragrant creamy-white flowers, and small orange-colored fruit

Part used: Fruit rind

Data: The fruit is harvested before fully ripe so the rind can remain attached to the body of the fruit during the extraction process. Tangerine is larger and darker in color than mandarin. Although the fruit and aromas of tangerine and mandarin can easily be confused, their essential oils have slightly different therapeutic properties. Originally from China, tangerine is closely related to mandarin. The name tangerine comes from the fact that the fruit was widely grown around Tangiers, a port town in Morocco.

134. Tarragon Essential Oil

Type of plant: Perennial herb growing to 3 feet in height with a central stalk off which are branches with long, thin, bright-green leaves. Depending on the subspecies, there may be clusters of tiny green-yellow flowers.

Part used: Leaves and stems

Data: Tarragon is best known as a culinary herb. Tarragon essential oil is used in perfumery and for fragrancing detergents. To grow French tarragon, keep in mind that fertile seeds are not available so propagation is carried out by root separation. When purchasing essential oils, the botanical name is important to confirm because there are some Artemisia genus plants and oils that need to be avoided. Look for the botanical name above and avoid Russian tarragon, which has a very similar name — Artemisia dracunculoides

135. Thyme Linalol Essential Oil

Thyme, familiar to most as a common seasoning for cooking, produces and essential oil that has valuable cleansing and purifying properties.  It is also notable for its broad-spectrum activity for winter health.

Thymus vulgaris (common thyme) is a flowering plant in the Lamiaceae (mint) family.  It is native to southern Europe, from the western Mediterranean to southern Italy.

Thymus vulgarisis a generally upright, bushy, woody-based perennial, primarily grown as a culinary herb in herb gardens.  Growing from ½ to 1 foot tall, and about the same in width, its stems are clothed with tiny, linear to elliptic, pointed, gray-green leaves which are distinctively revolute, with small, highly aromatic, grey-green leaves and, in early summer, clusters of showy purple or pink flowers.

The leaves of the Thymus vulgaris are frequently used — fresh or dried — as a seasoning in a variety of culinary applications, including soups, stews, sauces, meat and fish dishes.

Thought to impart courage to its bearer, ladies of the Middle Ages would give thyme to knights and warriors, before they went into battle.  During this same period, it was often placed beneath pillows, to help promote a peaceful sleep and to ward off nightmares.  The ancient Greeks used thyme in their baths, and burned it as an incense in their temples, while the Egyptians used it in their embalming rites.

Thyme oil is steam distilled from the leaves of the Thymus vulgaris plant, yielding an oil with a warm, herbaceous, floral, powdery aroma, high in the chemical compound of thymol.

Thyme oil, like the fresh or dried herb, is excellent in cooking; but the oil also provides cleansing and clarifying effects for the skin; however, due to its high phenol content, thyme should always be diluted with  carrier oil,  before application.

Thyme oil is composed of specific chemical compounds that produce broad-spectrum activity, in promoting winter-time health.  Including thyme essential oil in food dishes, or consuming one to two drops a day, will promote a healthy immune system, when seasonal threats are high.

How to use –

  • Diffusion: Use three to four drops in the diffuser of your choice.
  • Internal use: Dilute one drop in 4 fl oz of liquid.
  • Topical use: Dilute one to two drops with carrier oil, then apply to desired area.  See additional precautions below.

136. Tuberose Absolute Essential Oil

Type of plant: Perennial bulbous plant with tall, straight stems on top of which are highly fragrant, creamy-white, star-shaped flowers

Part used: Flowers

Data: Tuberose is a night-flowering plant pollinated by moths. Despite the name, it’s not related to rose and derives its name from its tuberous root. Native to Mexico and Central America, the flower has been adopted in Hawaii, where the highly fragrant flowers are used as personal decoration, and in India, where garlands are offered to images of gods and goddesses. It’s said that the plant was brought to France in the sixteenth century by a missionary who then cultivated it in a monastery garden. The fragrance of tuberose is so intense it became a mainstay of the French perfume industry as it developed – Grasse, Provence.

137. Valerian Essential Oil

Type of plant: A tall herb growing to 5 feet in height, with dark leaves and long stems with flower heads comprising many small white flowers with a pink tinge

Part used: Roots

Data: Valerian roots are quite thick, and when removed from the ground they appear as bundles of rope. This is an herb that was once considered magical, probably because of its hypnotic properties. There are many different varieties of valerian in the world, all of which appear to be sedative to some degree. Valerian is used in homeopathic as well as in herbal medicine.

138. Vanilla Absolute Essential Oil

Type of plant: A climbing vine that can grow to 80 feet long but is pruned well back, with orchid flowers that produce the fruit, known as pods, which are 6–7 inches long

Part used: Bean pod

Data: The now ubiquitous vanilla started life in a very specific area of eastern Mexico, looked over by the Totonaco tribal people and pollinated by a tiny bee called the melipona bee. But the Aztecs invaded, and they in turn were invaded by the Spanish conquistadors in 1520, led by Hernán Cortés. The Aztec leader Moctezuma offered Cortés a nice drink of cacao beans and vanilla, but Cortés proceeded to trash the entire civilization and steal their gold. Everyone in Europe wanted the vanilla he brought back, but without the little bee, all plants taken away remained sterile. Hundreds of years passed. Eventually people realized they would have to hand-pollinate the flowers, on the one day they open, and the vanilla industry was born. Today, the best quality vanilla still comes from Mexico, and also from Madagascar and nearby islands. The unripe green fruit pods are put through a fermentative process to develop the familiar vanilla fragrance and become the pliable black cured pods that we recognize as natural vanilla.

139. Violet Leaf Essential Oil

Type of plant: Small perennial plant with dark-green, heart-shaped leaves and small, deep-violet flowers

Part used: Leaves

Data: The leaves are mentioned in old European herbals, recommended for a wide range of conditions, including bad breath, urinary tract infections, aches and pains, skin rashes, and bruising. The methods they used were infused oils and poultices. Violet pastilles were once a common European candy for sweetening breath, while violet flowers are still crystallized for cake and confectionery decoration. Violet syrups were once widely used in Europe as a throat salve, but today gourmet violet syrups are more likely to be found in floral-flavored cocktails.

140. Yarrow Essential Oil

Type of plant: Common perennial meadow herb growing over 2 feet high with feathery leaves and erect stems on which are heads of tiny white or pink flowers

Part used: Leaves and flowering tops

Data: The name Achillea comes from the ancient Greek myth of Achilles, who when wounded in battle was treated with yarrow by the goddess Aphrodite. This is more than myth though, because yarrow was still being used by soldiers in the field during the First World War to dress wounds, both to stem bleeding and to prevent infection. And even today herbalists refer to yarrow as “soldier’s wound wort,” “staunchwort,” and “nosebleed plant.” Yarrow is used in some pharmaceutical products for skin conditions, due to its anti-inflammatory agent, azulene, which gives the oil its characteristic blue color. The long, wood-like, dried stems of the yarrow plant continue to be used as the most traditionally correct tool for casting the I Ching, a mode of prophesy in China.

141. Yuzu Essential Oil

Type of plant: Small, thorny evergreen tree with dark, glossy leaves, creamy-white flowers, and large green or yellow fruit with an uneven surface

Part used: Fruit rind

Data: The tree is extensively grown in Japan, where it was introduced over 1,000 years ago. Yuzu is very cold-hardy and is therefore grown in areas too cold for other citrus fruits. In Japan and Korea the rind, juice, and fruit are used as flavoring, especially in vinegars, soups, seafood dishes, sauces, pickles, salads, cakes, candy, and both alcoholic and nonalcoholic drinks. In Japan, the yuzu fruit is added to bathwater, especially during the winter solstice, to ward off infections and bring a prosperity of health. Different parts of the yuzu fruit are used in beauty preparations, including the seeds, rind, and essential oil.